Browse Prior Art Database

System and Method for Validating an Operating System Scheduler

IP.com Disclosure Number: IPCOM000244901D
Publication Date: 2016-Jan-27
Document File: 5 page(s) / 83K

Publishing Venue

The IP.com Prior Art Database

Abstract

Disclosed is a system and method for testing an operating system to ensure that it correctly enforces its priority-setting or share-setting commands. The process includes elements that accomplish problem specification, calculation of correct answers, automatically running the problems, recording the observed results, comparing the observed behavior against the correct answers, and producing a binary, pass/fail assessment for each problem.

This text was extracted from a PDF file.
This is the abbreviated version, containing approximately 25% of the total text.

Page 01 of 5

System and Method for Validating an Operating System Scheduler

Operating systems supporting a multiplicity of dispatchable units usually offer some way for a system programmer or other support person to specify rules by which the operating system should prioritize the allocation of central processing unit (CPU) power

when the set of dispatchable units collectively wants more CPU power than the system

has to give. For example, when in a uniprocessor configuration two dispatchable units both want to use as much CPU power as possible, the operating system must meter out the single CPU's power to the two dispatchable units, because there is not enough power for both dispatchable units to consume as much power as each wants. The metering or parceling-out of the CPU power is done according to rules commonly known as priority rules or share rules. The rules are usually implemented in a command set; the commands of the set let the system administrator assign priorities or shares to the dispatchable units. It is then the job of the operating system's scheduler and dispatcher to parcel out CPU power in accordance with the issued commands.

The administrator in turn expects the operating system to meter or parcel out power as
it was instructed.

In environments where such operating systems are being developed or manufactured, it is necessary to implement some kind of software testing infrastructure that validates the operating system's scheduler with respect to said priority-setting or share-setting commands. Given a set of dispatchable units, the dispatchable units' demands for CPU power, and a sequence of share-setting commands that have been issued, did the operating system meter or parcel out the CPU power in accordance with the settings specified in the issued commands? Answering this question is essential for quality

control of the operating system being manufactured. If the operating system does not enforce its commands, the system administrators at customer sites cannot control those systems.

A system and method are needed for testing the operating system to ensure it correctly enforces its priority-setting or share-setting commands.

The novel contribution is a system and method that includes elements accomplishing problem specification, calculation of correct answers, automatically running the problems, recording the observed results, comparing the observed behavior against the correct answers, and producing a binary, pass/fail assessment for each problem. This approach gives the operating system a list of scheduler validation problems to solve and checks for the expected scheduler behavior.

The core idea of the novel solution is to specify a list of problems for the scheduler to solve. Each problem consists of a machine capacity, a list of dispatchable units to be run, and for each dispatchable unit the associated priority or share setting and the expected CPU demand.

Then, for each such problem, the first step mathematically solves...