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METHOD FOR MORPHING STRUCTURED MESHES

IP.com Disclosure Number: IPCOM000244910D
Publication Date: 2016-Jan-28
Document File: 9 page(s) / 483K

Publishing Venue

The IP.com Prior Art Database

Abstract

A structured meshing method is provided for computational fluid dynamics ("CFD") analysis of turbomachinery components. Algorithms are developed to morph the mesh of an existing/baseline axisymmetric design onto a non-axisymmetric geometry surface of a new design. As the mesh is not re-generated, the morphing is very fast and enables study of multiple variations of non-axisymmetric endwall geometries.

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METHOD FOR MORPHING STRUCTURED MESHES

ABSTRACT


[0001] A structured meshing method is provided for computational fluid dynamics ("CFD") analysis of turbomachinery components. Algorithms are developed to morph the mesh of an existing/baseline axisymmetric design onto a non-axisymmetric geometry surface of a new design. As the mesh is not re-generated, the morphing is very fast and enables study of multiple variations of non-axisymmetric endwall geometries.

BACKGROUND


[0002] This disclosure relates to the application of CFD analysis to non-axisymmetric components. More particularly, it relates to structured meshing for CFD analysis of turbomachinery components (e.g. turbine blades, compressor rotors, fans).


[0003] Non-axisymmetric contoured end walls are used in turbomachinery components (e.g., axial and radial compressors and turbines) to provide improved aerodynamic efficiency as compared to axisymmetric components. The benefit of these non- axisymmetric designs is assessed in the design phase using CFD analysis of the turbomachinery component. Often, for several other technical reasons, a structured mesh and a structured CFD solver software program are used to assess this benefit. In such situations, typically, the baseline axisymmetric endwall performance is first assessed. Then, various physics driven non-axisymmetric designs are made using a geometry designer or a CAD tool.


[0004] To assess the CFD performance of each of new non-axisymmetric geometry or shape with respect to the baseline axisymmetric design, this geometry has to be meshed and a CFD analysis has to be done. In such situations, the relative performance between designs is important to distinguish and select the best design. Hence, it is ideal to keep the same mesh topology, mesh count, mesh distribution, mesh first cell height, and other mesh properties and only vary the geometry. This way, the sensitivity of the CFD result

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to the different grids is alleviated. In a conventional scenario, one would have to re-mesh each design from scratch, consuming a large amount of computing cycle time. This presents a challenge in terms of getting meshes robustly and quickly.

DESCRIPTION OF THE DRAWINGS


[0005] The concept may be best understood by reference to the following description taken in conjunction with the accompanying drawing figures, in which:


[0006] FIG. 1 is a schematic perspective view showing a portion of a turbine rotor having an axially-symmetric hub;


[0007] FIG. 2 is a schematic perspective view showing a portion of a turbine rotor having a 3D-contoured hub;


[0008] FIG. 3 is a schematic diagram showing a parent mesh being transformed or morphed into a child mesh;


[0009] FIG. 4 is a block diagram showing a mesh morphing process;


[0010] FIGS. 5A- 5E are schematic sequential views depicting a data discretization process; and


[0011] FIG. 6 is a schematic view showing a mesh node projection process.

DETAILED DESCRIPTION OF THE CONCEPT


[0012] FIG...