Dismiss
InnovationQ will be updated on Sunday, Oct. 22, from 10am ET - noon. You may experience brief service interruptions during that time.
Browse Prior Art Database

ANGLED FASTBACK TURBULATOR

IP.com Disclosure Number: IPCOM000244918D
Publication Date: 2016-Jan-29

Publishing Venue

The IP.com Prior Art Database

Abstract

A structure for disrupting the flow of a fluid, the structure comprising: (a) a first lateral wall and a second lateral wall spaced apart from one another, yet joined, by a floor; (b) a partial turbulator extending between the first lateral wall and the second lateral wall, the turbulator extending away from the floor, the partial turbulator comprising: (i) a front surface partially extending between the first lateral wall and the second lateral wall, the front surface extending from the floor and having a segment that is angled less than forty five degrees with respect to a Y-axis extending perpendicularly from the floor, and (ii) a rear surface extending between the first lateral wall and the second lateral wall, the rear surface extending between the front surface and the floor and including an inclining portion that is angled between zero and forty-five degrees with respect to a Z-axis extending parallel to the floor, the Z-axis being perpendicular to the Y-axis; and, (c) a concavity formed into the floor that interposes the partial turbulator and at least one of the first lateral wall and the second lateral wall.

This text was extracted from a PDF file.
This is the abbreviated version, containing approximately 5% of the total text.

Page 01 of 34

ANGLED FASTBACK TURBULATOR

ABSTRACT

    A structure for disrupting the flow of a fluid, the structure comprising: (a) a first lateral wall and a second lateral wall spaced apart from one another, yet joined, by a floor; (b) a partial turbulator extending between the first lateral wall and the second lateral wall, the turbulator extending away from the floor, the partial turbulator comprising: (i) a front surface partially extending between the first lateral wall and the second lateral wall, the front surface extending from the floor and having a segment that is angled less than forty five degrees with respect to a Y-axis extending perpendicularly from the floor, and (ii) a rear surface extending between the first lateral wall and the second lateral wall, the rear surface extending between the front surface and the floor and including an inclining portion that is angled between zero and forty-five degrees with respect to a Z-axis extending parallel to the floor, the Z-axis being perpendicular to the Y-axis; and, (c) a concavity formed into the floor that interposes the partial turbulator and at least one of the first lateral wall and the second lateral wall.

BACKGROUND


[0001]This disclosure relates generally to heat transfer in gas turbine engines and more particularly to apparatus for cooling structures in such engines.


[0002]A gas turbine engine includes a turbomachinery core having a high pressure compressor, combustor, and high pressure turbine ("HPT") in serial flow relationship. The core is operable in a known manner to generate a primary gas flow. The high pressure turbine includes annular arrays ("rows") of stationary vanes or nozzles that direct the gases exiting the combustor into rotating blades or buckets. Collectively one row of nozzles and one row of blades make up a "stage". Typically two or more stages are used in serial flow relationship. The combustor and HPT components operate in an extremely high temperature environment, and must be cooled by air flow to ensure adequate service life.


[0003]Cooling air flow is typically provided by utilizing relatively lower-temperature "bleed"


Page 02 of 34

   

air extracted from an upstream part of the engine, for example the high pressure compressor, and then feeding that bleed air to high-temperature downstream components. The bleed air may be applied in numerous ways, for example through internal convection cooling or through film cooling or both. Preexisting usage of bleed air and other cooling air flows the air over rib rougheners, trip strips, and pin fins. When used for convection cooling, the bleed air is often routed through serpentine passages or other structures which generate a pressure loss as the cooling air passes through them. Because bleed air represents a loss to the engine cycle and reduces efficiency, it is desired to maximize heat transfer rates and thereby use the minimum amount of cooling flow possible. For this reason heat transfer improvement structu...