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 Wearable Sensors that Gather and Present Data and Visualizations

IP.com Disclosure Number: IPCOM000245150D
Publication Date: 2016-Feb-14
Document File: 3 page(s) / 130K

Publishing Venue

The IP.com Prior Art Database

Abstract

Disclosed is a novel application for touch-enabling textiles that uses a system of wearable sensors for gathering and presenting data and visualizations. The system comprises a piece of clothing, such as a shirt, which is touch-enabled and a recording device that keeps track of the location, type, force, and frequency of any contact that a user makes to a designated area.

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Wearable Sensors that Gather and Present Data and Visualizations

Athletic, massage, and physiotherapists spend time each session interviewing patients to gather data about how pain and injuries are affecting the person's daily tasks. Much of this data is very subjective and is provided by a client who is not a domain expert and might not have a detailed record of experienced pain levels, because a person does not always pay close, conscious attention. Much of a person's reaction to the pain occurs at the subconscious level, so it is difficult for a person to relate all experiences between the sessions. Therapists must develop knowledge of the patient in order to be able to interpret the person's descriptions of the pain and its effects on day-to-day actions.

The novel contribution is a system of wearable sensors that gather and present data and visualizations . The system comprises a piece of clothing, such as a shirt, which is touch-enabled and a recording device that keeps track of the location, type, force, and frequency of any contact that a user makes to a designated area that covers an area of injury under treatment by a therapist . The system is Wi-Fi enabled, which makes the data available to the user's therapist whenever required.

The system makes use of touch-enabled fabrics to track, on a continuous basis, how a person is subconsciously reacting to an injury. People often perform self-massage on the areas (e.g., a muscle or joint) that are affected by pain or injury in an effort to relieve the pain. This self-massage is useful to help alleviate some of the pain sympt...