Browse Prior Art Database

Grab handles for Person Support Apparatus

IP.com Disclosure Number: IPCOM000245486D
Publication Date: 2016-Mar-11
Document File: 7 page(s) / 155K

Publishing Venue

The IP.com Prior Art Database

Abstract

Relates generally to a person support apparatus. More specifically, but not exclusively, the present disclosure relates to grab handles for the person support apparatus. Steve Hankins shankins@rshc-law.com

This text was extracted from a Microsoft Word document.
At least one non-text object (such as an image or picture) has been suppressed.
This is the abbreviated version, containing approximately 23% of the total text.

Grab handles for Person Support Apparatus

The present disclosure relates generally to a person support apparatus. More specifically, but not exclusively, the present disclosure relates to grab handles for the person support apparatus.

Generally, a healthcare facility is equipped with a number of person support apparatuses. These person support apparatuses are configured to support a person under medical guidance (patient). Typically, the person support apparatus can be manipulated to achieve both a conventional bed position, that is, a horizontal position with a horizontal support surface and a chair position, that is, an upright position. In the upright position, the feet of the patient may be on or adjacent to the floor and the head and back of the patient supported above a seat formed by the person support apparatus. A typical person support apparatus generally includes decks with person support surface mounted thereon, that are movable between the horizontal position and the upright position.

It is also known that patients egress from a side of the person support apparatus. Before the patient is able to egress, the patient must rotate the patient's body on the support surface to face towards the side, swing the patient's legs over the side of the person support apparatus, and remain sitting in the upright position without support from the support surface to the patient's back. Such coordinated movement to egress from the side of the person support apparatus may be difficult for some patients. As a result, egress from the upright position of the person support apparatus may be more suitable to some patients. Hence, the person support apparatus is moved to the upright position to facilitate the patient's ability to egress from the person support apparatus and stand up in a manner similar to standing up from a chair. With the person support apparatus in the upright position, the patient begins with the patient's feet resting on the floor, the patient sitting in the upright position, and the patient's back being supported by the support surface. To egress from the person support apparatus, the patient supports a portion of the patient's weight on the support surface on each side of the patient or on a caregiver standing next to the person support apparatus. The patient then leans forward and transfers the remaining weight to the patient's feet.

However, some patients may still have difficulty standing up from the person support apparatuses even when the person support apparatuses are in the upright position. One reason for the difficulty, in some instances, is that the seating surface of the person support apparatus in the upright position may be too high or too low for the particular patient. In other instances, the difficulty may be created due to a seat region of the person support surface being too soft such that the patient's immersion into the seat region presents an egress impediment. Accordingly, a need persists in improving person su...