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Person Support Surface to Detect Bottoming Out Situation

IP.com Disclosure Number: IPCOM000245602D
Publication Date: 2016-Mar-21
Document File: 5 page(s) / 262K

Publishing Venue

The IP.com Prior Art Database

Abstract

Relates to a person support surface. More specifically, but not exclusively, the disclosure relates to the person support surface configured to detect a bottoming out situation.

Steve Hankins shankins@rshc-law.com

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Person Support Surface to Detect Bottoming Out Situation

This disclosure generally relates to a person support surface. More specifically, but not exclusively, the disclosure relates to the person support surface configured to detect a bottoming out situation.

Generally, a healthcare facility is equipped with a number of person support apparatuses. Each person support apparatus may be equipped with a person support surface, configured to support a person. The person support surface may support the person by providing a therapeutic pressure against a pressure exerted due to the weight of the person. In certain situations, such as, when the person immediately lies on the person support surface, the therapeutic pressure fails to support the person and the person has a contact with a lower surface of the person support surface. This situation is termed as bottoming out situation.

The bottoming out situation causes lack of support to the person by the person support surface. The bottoming out situation may lead to safety and medical concerns. Patients may develop decubitus ulcers caused by pressure, friction, and/or heat developed. The bottoming out situation may thus, increase the discomfort for the person. While various solutions have been developed to provide arrangements that can solve the problem cited above, there is still room for development. Thus, a need persists for further contributions in this area of technology.

The disclosure relates in general to a person support surface. The person support surface includes an upper surface, a lower surface, a plurality of inflatable members, and at least one tape switch. The upper surface experiences a pressure exerted by a person on the person support surface. The plurality of inflatable members support the pressure exerted by the person on the upper surface. The tape switches are positioned between the inflatable members and the lower surface. The tape switches are configured to detect a bottoming out situation of the inflatable members.

An exemplary side view of a person support surface 100 is shown in Fig.1. The person support surface 100 includes an upper surface 105, a plurality of inflatable members 110, at least one tape switch 115, and a lower surface 120. The upper surface 105 of the person support surface 100 experiences a pressure due to a weight of a person. The upper surface has a direct contact with the person and transfers the pressure to the inflatable members 110 installed in the system. The inflatable members 110 exert a therapeutic pressure to support the pressure exerted by the person on the upper surface 105. The therapeutic pressure causes the person to be in a comfortable situation. In certain situations, such as, sudden sitting of the person on the person support surface 100 causes the pressure exerted by the person to exceed the therapeutic pressure. The situation is referred to as “bottoming out” situation. As used herein, the term “bottoming out” refers to a situ...