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MEMS tubes/nodes for seismic acquisition

IP.com Disclosure Number: IPCOM000245610D
Publication Date: 2016-Mar-22
Document File: 6 page(s) / 146K

Publishing Venue

The IP.com Prior Art Database

Abstract

The cost of a MEMS accelerometer is rapidly decreasing and can reduce to the cost of producing the silicon wafer that contains the MEMS after development costs have been recouped. Integrating more and more of the Instrument test electronics and multi-rate down-sampling, anti-aliasing, instrument filters on the same chip as the MEMS can also reduce both power consumption and cost. However, real-time telemetry and data storing still puts a limit on data transfer or local data storage. The current patent application puts forward the idea of a system that uses multiple MEMS in a small unit, for example a thin cable (tube), with a particular spatial spread and local data processing abilities for infield data processing such as digital group-forming, multi-channel filtering, QC, interpolation and smart data reduction/compression methods that can also benefit from multi-channel acquisition. Although this invention generally concentrates on MEMS, however other types of sensors, similar to a hydrophone, can be integrated into the unit. The preferred shape of the unit is a long tube (thin cable) that can be shaped in the field into a particular form with a predefined shape determined by the geophysicist using a form template (or some device) to plant each sensor in the tube/node at a well-defined position and in the shape that defines the preferred spatial sampling.

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Page 01 of 6

Title: MEMS tubes/nodes for seismic acquisition

Description

The cost of a MEMS accelerometer is rapidly decreasing and can reduce to the cost of producing the silicon wafer that contains the MEMS after development costs have been recouped. Integrating more and more of the Instrument test electronics and multi-rate down-sampling, anti-aliasing, instrument filters on the same chip as the MEMS can also reduce both power consumption and cost. However, real-time telemetry and data storing still puts a limit on data transfer or local data storage. The current patent application puts forward the idea of a system that uses multiple MEMS in a small unit, for example a thin cable (tube), with a particular spatial spread and local data processing abilities for infield data processing such as digital group-forming, multi-channel filtering, QC, interpolation and smart data reduction/compression methods that can also benefit from multi-channel acquisition. Although this invention generally concentrates on MEMS, however other types of sensors, similar to a hydrophone, can be integrated into the unit. The preferred shape of the unit is a long tube (thin cable) that can be shaped in the field into a particular form with a predefined shape determined by the geophysicist using a form template (or some device) to plant each sensor in the tube/node at a well- defined position and in the shape that defines the preferred spatial sampling.

Different types of digital group-forming today are implemented in the central acquisition system after the individual single sensor's data are transmitted to the central system. That requires transmitting a lot of data to the central acquisition system. Inside-node multi-trace processing has as a consequence a reduction of data rate thus reducing the data transmission rate many folds easing the complexity of the network that supports the sensors.

The idea also allows infield digitally group-formed seismic acquisition, equivalent to the analog group- forming acquisition. A unit can be implemented as an autonomous node. It preserves the analog system's advantages similar to reducing the data rate and reducing incoherent noise whereas it also benefits from digital processing prior to group-forming. Each autonomous unit in this seismic system is having its own central processing unit. Each sensor unit in the tube (node) transmits its down-sampled data to the central processing unit in the tube (node). Data from all the MEMS/sensors then are processed in this central processing unit before in one realization being grouped. A single filtered trace or several traces are then transmitted to the central system through a network, in a wireless manner or through wires, or locally stored to be harvested later. In addition to seismic sensing elements similar to MEMS the tube can be instrumented with compasses, inclinometers and other types of measuring devices.

A tube (thin cable)/node can contain many MEMS sensor units (or other...