Browse Prior Art Database

Method and System for Providing Silicone Coated Air-flow Surfaces for Air Purification within IT Hardware

IP.com Disclosure Number: IPCOM000245670D
Publication Date: 2016-Mar-28
Document File: 3 page(s) / 96K

Publishing Venue

The IP.com Prior Art Database

Abstract

A method and system is disclosed for modifying air-flowing surfaces in IT Hardware by coating air-flowing surfaces with a sulfur absorbing/gettering compound that does not obstruct the air flow within the hardware.

This text was extracted from a PDF file.
This is the abbreviated version, containing approximately 51% of the total text.

Page 01 of 3

Method and System for Providing Silicone Coated Air-flow Surfaces for Air Purification within IT Hardware

Electronics industry designs and tests hardware to be able to withstand typical indoor air environments. Several hardware failures occur in geographies known to exhibit harsh indoor air environments, resulting in component failure due to corrosion of metallurgy via atypical air contaminants in the environment. Existing methods to mitigate these failures have focused on use of commercially available conformal coatings or air/chemical purification filters. The conformal coatings (a protective chemical coating or polymer film that 'conforms' to the circuit board topology for the purpose of protecting electronic circuits from harsh environments that may contain moisture and/or chemical contaminants) fall into one of several generic classes: silicones, epoxies, acrylates, or other organic materials. However, accelerated aging testing has revealed that silicones may actually exacerbate the problem and that corrosion is merely retarded by the other classes of conformal coatings. Furthermore, studies have revealed that the major air contaminant culprit is elemental sulfur, H2S, or sulfur oxides. Of these, elemental sulfur appears to be the most aggressive.

Disclosed is a method and system for modifying air-flowing surfaces in IT Hardware by coating the air-flowing surfaces with a sulfur absorbing/gettering compound that does not obstruct the air flow within the hardware. One such area of interest is the fan assembly in mainframes and other IT hardware where high amounts of data center air pass through the assembly and over the surfaces of the device. Air contact with these

surfaces provides an opportunity to craft an air purification means that does not substantially impede air flow.

The method and system mixes sacrificial particulate with a silicone-based material,

which is then sprayed, dipped, or painted onto air flow surfaces which are exposed to contaminated air prior to the air coming in contact with components susceptible to corrosion. The sacrificial particulate acts as a gettering agent within the coating to reduce sulfur in the air, preventing it from contacting IT Hardware components. The sulfur reacts with the sacrificial particulate to form sulfide containing compounds. The silicone-based coatings that are placed onto these air flow surfaces are allowed to react

with the incoming air flow (without substantially degrading the air flow performance) to reduce corrosion downstream and thus extending the life of the hardware.

In an exemplary implementation, sacrificial nanoparticles (such as copper or silver) are used as a filler that can sel...