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Methods of Manufacturing Tubeless Tires Containing an Impermeable Film Layer

IP.com Disclosure Number: IPCOM000245674D
Publication Date: 2016-Mar-29
Document File: 3 page(s) / 112K

Publishing Venue

The IP.com Prior Art Database

Abstract

This disclosure relates to an improved process of manufacturing tubeless tires containing an impermeable film layer. The impermeable film layer is radially inward of the tire carcass and is sandwiched between the tire carcass and a layer of specially formulated rubber compound. The film can be polyamide based or ethylene vinyl alcohol (EVOH) based. The improved process further comprises treating the impermeable film layer with a resorcinol formaldehyde (RFL) adhesive containing high aspect ratio nano or platy particles.

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Methods of Manufacturing Tubeless Tires Containing an Impermeable Film Layer

 

Abstract: This disclosure relates to an improved process of manufacturing tubeless tires containing an impermeable film layer. The impermeable film layer is radially inward of the tire carcass and is sandwiched between the tire carcass and a layer of specially formulated rubber compound. The film can be polyamide based or ethylene vinyl alcohol (EVOH) based. The improved process further comprises treating the impermeable film layer with a resorcinol formaldehyde (RFL) adhesive containing high aspect ratio nano or platy particles.

Background

Tubeless tires generally contain an impermeable layer, also known as an innerliner, designed to retain tire inflation pressure. An innerliner's ability to retain tire inflation pressure is dependent on the air impermeability characteristics of the compounds used to form the innerliner. In conventional tubeless tires, halobutyl polymers are preferred materials of choice for providing the requisite air impermeability characteristics to the innerliner. In particular, innerliners are generally formed from thermoplastic films based on blends of polyamide or ethylene vinyl alcohol (EVOH) with halobutyl polymer. However, using these thermoplastic blend based films as innerliners poses several challenges. For instance, these films generally suffer from poor adhesion to the tire carcass and are moisture sensitive. In addition, polyamide based films are sensitive to high temperature steam which may be used in tire curing systems. Currently, the poor adhesion of thermoplastic blend based films to the tire carcass is partially addressed by applying an adhesive coating or layer to the innerliner.

There is a need for a method to improve the adhesion of thermoplastic blend based film innerliners to the tire carcass and to protect these films from direct exposure to moisture and/or high temperatures. Furthermore, there is a need for adhesive layers capable of enhancing the air impermeability properties of the innerliner.

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