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Image based Delivery Authentication

IP.com Disclosure Number: IPCOM000245682D
Publication Date: 2016-Mar-30
Document File: 1 page(s) / 20K

Publishing Venue

The IP.com Prior Art Database

Abstract

When delivering goods there is a requirement for non-repudiation by the sender that the recipient has received the items. Barcodes, electronic signatures, calling cards and hidden delivery locations are just some of the mechanisms currently used to ensure that a delivery cycle has been completed, and that the goods have been delivered to the correct person/location. Problems occur when there is dispute from the receiver that their signature is not 'theirs' and/or goods have not been received or when the supplier/delivery company insist that an item was delivered to the correct location but the customer has not received the item. In summary, the proposed solution is that a user selected "image" is broken down/cut into two or more fragments. For the "Delivery Process" to complete, all fragments of the image must be present to reform the whole User Selected Image. This combined image in itself maybe be sufficient to complete the transaction, or may link to a second 'phase' of security process.

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Image based Delivery Authentication

In order to provide non-repudiation for the delivery of goods, a user selected "image" is broken down/cut into two or more fragments. For the "Delivery Process" to complete, all fragments of the image must be present to reform the whole User Selected Image. This combined image in itself maybe be sufficient to complete the transaction, or may link to a second 'phase' of security process. The following flow describes the system herein followed by an example implementation using a QR code for the image.


1) Online purchase is made


2) Image is selected, or generated by the system


3) Image is divided into 2 component parts


4) 1 part of the image is passed to the Customer/Recipient


5) 1 part of the image is passed to the delivery organisation


6) Delivery is made and confirmed by both parts of the image being re-joined

    If one uses a QR Code as an example, the online purchase system would generate the QR Code. If this is split into two halves, neither has any intrinsic value, however when placed together at the point of delivery, the completed QR Code would provide a scannable confirmation/URL that confirms delivery to intended recipient. Furthermore, if the 'Recipient' is happy to be absent at time of delivery, the half image could be positioned in a visible location e.g. to the top of a safe-box, which then enables the delivery to complete (this is conducted at the recipients risk, but avoids the need for a re-delivery or collection)...