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USE OF 1,3-DICHLORO-2-PROPANOL DERIVED ALKYL ETHER SULFONATE SURFACTANTS IN CONCENTRATED LIQUID LAUNDRY SYSTEMS TO ACHIEVE CLEAR, FLAWABLE SUSPENSIONS

IP.com Disclosure Number: IPCOM000245704D
Publication Date: 2016-Mar-31
Document File: 3 page(s) / 43K

Publishing Venue

The IP.com Prior Art Database

Abstract

Use of alkyl ether sulfonate surfactants in concentrated liquid laundry systems as viscosity regulators. These surfactants can be alternatives to solvents such as propylene glycol and ethanol, or conventional hydrotropes such as sodium xylene sulfonate.

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suTitle: “Use of 1,3-dichloro-2-propanol derived alkyl ether sulfonate surfactants in concentrated liquid laundry systems to achieve clear, flowable suspensions”.

Summary

We disclose the use of alkyl ether sulfonate surfactants in concentrated liquid laundry systems as viscosity regulators. These surfactants can be alternatives to solvents such as propylene glycol and ethanol, or conventional hydrotropes such as sodium xylene sulfonate.

1. Introduction

Large amounts of solvents/hydrotropes are typically used in highly concentrated surfactant formulations to reduce their otherwise high viscosity and allow for clear and single phase products. Typical solvents used for these purposes are propylene glycol and ethanol, which take up space in a formulation while often not contributing to performance, or are flammable (high cost for storage and transportation). One example of such system is liquid laundry concentrates. Removal of these solvents from formulations while maintaining target viscosities and clarity is desired.

2. Experimental

2.1 Technology

Adding small amounts of experimental 1,3-dichloropropanol (DCP)-derived disulfonate surfactants (EAS, see Figure 1 for structure) to the mixture of commonly used surfactants (Linear alkylbenzene sulfonate (LAS), Alcohol ethoxylate (AE) and Sulfated alcohol ethoxylate (AEOS)) in liquid laundry formulations results in prevention of phase separation and lowering of viscosity (in other words, the EAS allows for high surfactant concentration formulations to be stable). In all these cases, no additional solvent or hydrotrope is added. The EAS is at least comparable to a commercial material such as sodium xylene sulfonate (SXS), and is more efficient than a solvent such as propylene glycol on a mass basis.

Figure 1: Structure of the anionic surfactants used in this study. R is an alkyl group (if a surfactant is referred to as C8, then R = C5H11)

Our focus is on C8 and C10 EAS surfactants; the former is a blend of sodium 2-octan-2-yloxypropane-1,3-disulfonate and sodium 2-octan-2-yloxy-3-hydroxypropane-1-sulfonate, the latter is a blend of sodium 2-decan-2-yloxypropane-1,3-disulfonate and sodium 2-decan-2-yloxy-3-hydroxypropane-1-sulfonate (full chemical names)

2.2 Experimental procedures

Two protocols are followed to generate samples and measure the viscosity of formulations.

Protocol 1

Preparation of formulations: Combine water, LABS (NACCONOL 90G, 90% actives), AEOS (STEOL CS 270, 70% actives), AE (BIOSOFT N25-7, 100% actives), sodium citrate dihydrate and solvent (propylene glycol) or hydrotrope (SXS, Sigma Aldrich) or EAS (C8 or C10, liquid or powder form) in the appropriate amounts in a MAX 20 plastic cup. Use a FlackTek Speedmixer™ (Model DAC150.1 FVZ-K) at 2500 rpm for 3 min. Observe solution for any undissolved components or clumps; and if present, run at 2500 rpm in the speedmixer for an additional minute. Allow at least 2 days for samples to equilibrate before performing any tests.

Measuremen...