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Using Electronic Ink to Render Barcodes Intelligible

IP.com Disclosure Number: IPCOM000245715D
Publication Date: 2016-Mar-31
Document File: 1 page(s) / 92K

Publishing Venue

The IP.com Prior Art Database

Abstract

The method includes using a strip of electronic ink material to be part of the background of the perishable good's barcode. The perishable good's barcode can either be printed over the electronic ink material or displayed by electronic ink material. The strip of electronic ink material should be parallel to the bars of the barcode. The strip of electronic ink is controlled by a small circuit that could be powered by a printed battery. The electronic ink changes color the expiration date, making the perishable good's barcode unscannable. Furthermore, the electronic ink material can be long and wide enough to make at least one printed digit under the perishable good's barcode unreadable by the human operator, to prevent the operator from manually entering the barcode info.

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Using Electronic Ink to Render Barcodes Intelligible

     An issue exists where perishable goods are sold past their expiration date. A possible solution for this includes a method to make the perishable good's barcode unreadable after a set date that corresponds to the good's expiration date.

     The method includes using a strip of electronic ink material to be part of the background of the perishable good's barcode. The perishable good's barcode can either be printed over the electronic ink material or displayed by electronic ink material. The strip of electronic ink material should be parallel to the bars of the barcode. The strip of electronic ink is controlled by a small circuit that could be powered by a printed battery. The electronic ink changes color the expiration date, making the perishable good's barcode unscannable. Furthermore, the electronic ink material can be long and wide enough to make at least one printed digit under the perishable good's barcode unreadable by the human operator, to prevent the operator from manually entering the barcode info.

     Without a scannable barcode or a readable UPC, the perishable good will be deterred in being sold to an unknowing customer.