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Power Converter FET Switching with Switched Remote Sense

IP.com Disclosure Number: IPCOM000245734D
Publication Date: 2016-Apr-04
Document File: 1 page(s) / 32K

Publishing Venue

The IP.com Prior Art Database

Abstract

Disclosed is a method to add multiple remote sense locations that can be switched-in through low power Field Effect Transistors (FETs) in order to convert power in integrated circuit boards.

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Power Converter FET Switching with Switched Remote Sense

Integrated circuits often require multiple voltage rails for power. When this occurs, the manufacturer provides a power on/off sequence for these voltage rails. If multiple different types of these chips are placed on a board, then a few common voltage rails will exist, which can be combined to save space with a single converter. Quite often, these chips have competing voltage rail sequencing requirements that do not allow an easy rail consolidation.

The most typical method for combing these rails involves putting in a single voltage converter with a single output, which

is then tapped off with a plural of Field Effect Transistors (FETs) or other type of transistor. The FETs or transistor can disconnect the voltage rail from one or more of the integrated circuit devices. The problem that arises with this method is that the voltage converter has to sense the associated output upstream of the FET switches. This can lead into issues

when the higher current-draw devices are downstream from one of the FETs.

The novel solution is to add multiple remote sense locations that can be switched-in through low power FETs.

The remote sense lines are connected locally through small, nominal impedance (e.g., 10 Ohms). The remote sense lines are also connected to the downstream side of one of the FET switches by use of a lower power FET (a 2n7002

works well here). The power FET switch is controlled by a power sequencer, as...