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Use of EDR as a Glycol Reclamation Technology

IP.com Disclosure Number: IPCOM000245751D
Publication Date: 2016-Apr-04
Document File: 1 page(s) / 53K

Publishing Venue

The IP.com Prior Art Database

Abstract

Standard industry technology for removing salt from brine-glycol mixtures is to vaporize the liquids, leaving a solid salt, and recondense the portion of the stream desired, typically only the glycol. This process is energy intensive, operates under vacuum, and requires solids handling for the salt, all considered to be disadvantages to the approach. The proposed novel technique is to utilize EDR technology in a sufficiently dilute brine-glycol solution to reject the salt ions but retain the glycol in the product water stream.

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Proposal

EDR is a current technology for water purification patented as US 3029196 A in 1959 and further evolutions in subsequent years. The technology is based upon utilizing an electric field to drive the cations and anions in a solution in opposite direction through semi-permeable membranes on either side of the flowstream. This technology is an effective means of salt removal from water; however, it does not remove other water soluble contaminants such as polar hydrocarbons or bacteria. While not extracting these contaminants is a limitation of the technology for water purification, it can be an advantage in the desalination of brine-hydrocarbon mixtures and potentially an alternative to traditional salt removal from brine-glycol solutions.

Standard industry technology for removing salt from brine-glycol mixtures is to vaporize the liquids, leaving a solid salt, and recondense the portion of the stream desired, typically only the glycol. This process is energy intensive, operates under vacuum, and requires solids handling for the salt, all considered to be disadvantages to the approach. The proposed novel technique is to utilize EDR technology in a sufficiently dilute brine-glycol solution to reject the salt ions but retain the glycol in the product water stream. The membranes within the EDR should prevent glycol losses to the reject brine stream while the field created by the anode and cathode of the EDR should drive the salt ions from the feed stream into...