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CERTIFIED EQUIPMENT DEVICE FOR SECURE SOFTWARE DEPLOYMENT

IP.com Disclosure Number: IPCOM000245762D
Publication Date: 2016-Apr-05
Document File: 9 page(s) / 372K

Publishing Venue

The IP.com Prior Art Database

Abstract

The present disclosure describes a pluggable optical transceiver, such as 1G/10G Ethernet Small Form-factor Pluggables (SFP) with secure data storage and a low-grade processor thereon to enable various functions. The various functions can include, for example, containing a vendor's self-signed CA/root certificate or a certificate chain that roots back to CA certificate, which can validate the device certificate of vendor software on a networking device; loading software to a network device; exchanging data between the SFP and the hosting networking device via any prolific IP-based secure or insecure data transfer protocol over the pluggable device facing MSA standards compliant data pins for Ethernet data traffic delivery; local craft access; download\backup debug logs and performance\billing data; device recovery; and the like.

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CERTIFIED EQUIPMENT DEVICE FOR SECURE SOFTWARE DEPLOYMENT

ABSTRACT

[0001]               The present disclosure describes a pluggable optical transceiver, such as 1G/10G Ethernet Small Form-factor Pluggables (SFP) with secure data storage and a low-grade processor thereon to enable various functions.  The various functions can include, for example, containing a vendor’s self-signed CA/root certificate or a certificate chain that roots back to CA certificate, which can validate the device certificate of vendor software on a networking device; loading software to a network device; exchanging data between the SFP and the hosting networking device via any prolific IP-based secure or insecure data transfer protocol over the pluggable device facing MSA standards compliant data pins for Ethernet data traffic delivery; local craft access; download\backup debug logs and performance\billing data; device recovery; and the like.

BACKGROUND

[0002]               Pluggable optical transceivers, such as Ethernet interface Small Form-factor Pluggables (SFP), are currently deployed for one purpose: physical transmission of data. The industry is adopting application specific “smart” Ethernet SFPs that provide additional processing, function and protocol translation for Time Division Multiplexing (TDM_ pseudo-wires, Two-Way Active Measurement Protocol (TWAMP), Connectivity Fault Management (CFM), IEEE 1588v2, etc.  These “smart” SFPs currently provide a standalone function and interact with the host platform only for the purpose of access, transport and maintenance of the SFP function.  These SFPs are also generally equipped with proprietary hardware and software and are likely generally priced similarly to the hosting networking platform.

[0003]               Software rights today are regulated by contractual agreement and lexical software keys.  In some circumstance, the only deliverable to a networking solution from a vendor to a networking device may be the software itself.

[0004]               Cost effective SFP value add to the host platform operation: Prior to this disclosure, SFPs do not add value to the hosting networking platform for the purpose of software delivery, software maintenance, network supportability, and network recovery\resiliency, and current “smart” SFPs would generally seem over equipped and so overpriced to do so.

[0005]               Provision of proprietary hardware of generally compatible interface to provide software security: host network platform interface support varies, and there is not hardware component that can plug into a standards-based interface available on the majority of networking devices to add value to policing the security and rights to use the deployed software.

[0006]               Software today is backed up to compact flash, USB and other media supporting highly accessible “plug and play” storage interfaces. If able to deploy to any host device, once the software is stored on these easily accessible media, it takes little skill to copy, distribute and reverse engineer soft...