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AUTOMATICALLY CUSTOMIZING COLORLESS MUX/DEMUX ACCESS POINTS FOR REDUCING NOISE FUNNELING IMPACT ON TX OSNR

IP.com Disclosure Number: IPCOM000245763D
Publication Date: 2016-Apr-05

Publishing Venue

The IP.com Prior Art Database

Abstract

The present disclosure relates to an optical networking process for automatically customizing colorless multiplexer/demultiplexer (mux/demux) access ports for reducing noise funneling impact on transmitter (Tx) Optical Signal-to-Noise Ratio (OSNR). The process provides an automated way to minimize noise funnel impact over colorless mux/demux architecture that ensures same reach for all Tx's connected at the mux by optimizing Tx OSNR. The process also minimizes adjacent channel non-linear impacts on colorless demux drops for wider bandwith signals. With a common power spectral density (PSD) target set, the Tx connected at port having lower path loss will receive lower power targets and for the Tx connected in ports with higher path loss will receive higher power targets limited by the min and max capability of that particular Tx respectively. Similarly, with a common PSD target set, Tx with larger signal bandwidth will receive higher total signal power target and Tx with narrower signal BW will receive lower total signal power targets. The advantage of considering the worst possible PSD level with the worst possible path loss is that the common target remains uninterrupted even if circuit pack to circuit pack or mux module replacement takes place in the field.

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AUTOMATICALLY CUSTOMIZING COLORLESS MUX/DEMUX ACCESS POINTS FOR REDUCING NOISE FUNNELING IMPACT ON TX OSNR

ABSTRACT

[0001]               The present disclosure relates to an optical networking process for automatically customizing colorless multiplexer/demultiplexer (mux/demux) access ports for reducing noise funneling impact on transmitter (Tx) Optical Signal-to-Noise Ratio (OSNR).  The process provides an automated way to minimize noise funnel impact over colorless mux/demux architecture that ensures same reach for all Tx’s connected at the mux by optimizing Tx OSNR.  The process also minimizes adjacent channel non-linear impacts on colorless demux drops for wider bandwith signals.  With a common power spectral density (PSD) target set, the Tx connected at port having lower path loss will receive lower power targets and for the Tx connected in ports with higher path loss will receive higher power targets limited by the min and max capability of that particular Tx respectively. Similarly, with a common PSD target set, Tx with larger signal bandwidth will receive higher total signal power target and Tx with narrower signal BW will receive lower total signal power targets. The advantage of considering the worst possible PSD level with the worst possible path loss is that the common target remains uninterrupted even if circuit pack to circuit pack or mux module replacement takes place in the field.

BACKGROUND

[0002]               In optical networking, a typical colorless multiplexer/demultiplexer comes up with 12 to 16 add/drop ports followed by an optical amplifier to compensate for the insertion loss.  The usual technique of manual modification of transmitter (Tx) powers in such a structure to maximize Tx Optical Signal-to-Noise Ratio (OSNR) is very tedious.  The user will have to know whether to lower a Tx power or to increase the other ones, and often wonders what would be the optimal power level for each Tx.  Setting the power levels too low means not taking the full advantage of the configuration, and pushing power values too high may also saturate the optical amplifier that, in turn, causes further gain tilt and ripple and hence, OSNR impact over the spectrum.

[0003]               To minimize the impact, often Tx types of similar signal bandwidth (BW) and characteristics are plugged into the same colorless multiplexer so that each of them comes up more or less with the same per channel total power level.  In most cases, the tedious step by step procedure is followed with an Optical Spectrum Analyzer (OSA), while the colorless multiplexer is out-of-service i.e., before bringing up all the Tx’s in-service.  The risk of doing the procedure with in-service Tx’s in place is that if a Tx is inserted blindly at some arbitrary power level then that may impact Tx OSNR of other in-service channels.  To deal with that, an optical per channel power monitoring device or an OSA is often used tapping at the output port of the colorless mux, while new Tx’s power is introduced...