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Virtual Reality Devices having Proximity Detection

IP.com Disclosure Number: IPCOM000245804D
Publication Date: 2016-Apr-08
Document File: 2 page(s) / 79K

Publishing Venue

The IP.com Prior Art Database

Related People

Justin Mockler: INVENTOR [+2]

Abstract

Various virtual reality headsets have touch controls disposed on the headset – for example a touchpad located to allow the user to modify settings of the headset. However, during use of the virtual reality headset, it can be difficult to locate physical controls on the outside of the headset. When trying to locate the controls disposed on the headset, a user may accidentally activate the controls because the user is unable to precisely locate the control surface. For example, if the control is a Touchpad, the use may send an erroneous swipe or tap. This invention utilizes proximity sensing technology to show the user a graphical indication inside the headset where their finger is in relation to the control hardware to help accuracy and prevent false activations.

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Virtual Reality Devices having Proximity Detection

Justin Mockler

Virtual Reality Devices having Proximity Detection


1. Inventor(s): Justin Mockler, Kipling Inscore


2. Synaptics Incorporated, San Jose, CA, USA


3. Short Summary

Various virtual reality headsets have touch controls disposed on the headset - for example a touchpad located to allow the user to modify settings of the headset. However, during use of the virtual reality headset, it can be difficult to locate physical controls on the outside of the headset. When trying to locate the controls disposed on the headset, a user may accidentally activate the controls because the user is unable to precisely locate the control surface. For example, if the control is a Touchpad, the use may send an erroneous swipe or tap. This invention utilizes proximity sensing technology to show the user a graphical indication inside the headset where their finger is in relation to the control hardware to help accuracy and prevent false activations.


4. Some Problems Solved

Examples of some of the problems addressed by the invention include:

Using proximity sensing (i.e. hover over the control hardware) can prevent accidental swipes or taps when trying to locate a specific area of the control of the virtual reality hardware. Sensing an approaching input, the system provides a graphical solution that is invisible to the user and only appears when a finger is sensed near the control surface.


5. General Description

When a user is wearing and "inside" the virtual reality headset, they user would lift their hand and approach the a control surface, like a Touchpad, on the headset hardware. When in range of the hover sensitive Touchpad, a small graphic appears inside the headset that lets the user know where their finger is in relation to the Touchpad. This graphic could take many forms including showing a directional pad that has a cursor over it where the user would potentially land. It could also be a more abstract graphic, such as a low opacity highlight on the side of the screen, to give the user an approximate representation of their location. This graphic would ideally be located on the side of the screen where the TouchPad is located, but might also make sense directly in the center of the screen where the user is looking. After the TouchPad is interacted with, the graphic fades away.


6. Some Alternate Embodiments and Uses

Examples of alternate embodiments of the invention, and other uses of the invention, include:

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