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Detection of premature termination of voice transmission in PTT-enabled communication networks

IP.com Disclosure Number: IPCOM000245874D
Original Publication Date: 2016-Apr-14
Included in the Prior Art Database: 2016-Apr-14
Document File: 3 page(s) / 46K

Publishing Venue

Motorola

Related People

Swierczynski, Jarek: INVENTOR [+3]

Abstract

Push-to-talk (PTT), also known as Press-to-Transmit, is a method of having conversations or talking on half-duplex communication lines, including two-way radio, using a momentary button to switch from voice reception mode to transmit mode. In certain situations users may not be able to keep the PTT button pressed throughout their entire statement. This document describes a method of detecting such situations in order to continue voice transmission even after the PTT button is released.

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Detection of premature termination of voice transmission in PTT-enabled communication networks

By Jaroslaw Swierczynski, Radoslaw Sztando, Grzegorz Kaplita

Motorola Solutions

 

ABSTRACT

Push-to-talk (PTT), also known as Press-to-Transmit, is a method of having conversations or talking on half-duplex communication lines, including two-way radio, using a momentary button to switch from voice reception mode to transmit mode.[1]

In certain situations users may not be able to keep the PTT button pressed throughout their entire statement. This document describes a method of detecting such situations in order to continue voice transmission even after the PTT button is released.

PROBLEM

Professional two-way radios are employed mostly by public safety services. Users like police or firefighters face life-threatening situations on a daily basis. A radio is their primary and often the only way of communicating with an ally. Mission critical communication needs to be assured. It is not uncommon that a radio is the only mean to request help in a critical situation when life is endangered.

The necessity of keeping a button pressed in order to transmit voice is fundamentally a good thing. First and foremost it allows for better utilization of available resources. Another advantage is that users do not transmit more than they intend to.

However, downsides of PTT exist as well. Most notably, in certain situations – and this affects mainly firefighters – it is not possible to press the PTT button at all. Even if users do press the button, a dynamically changing situation may force them to release the button prematurely, that is before they transmit everything they want to communicate to the called party. It may be due to a sudden attack or another unexpected event such as ceiling collapse, or they may simply need both hands to be available immediately.

SOLUTION

Unintentional release of the PTT button can be detected by analyzing the volume level of audio received by a radio’s microphone when the PTT button is released.

Usually users press the PTT button immediately before starting to speak and release the button right after finishing the speech (see Figure 1: Usual PTT usage scenario).

Figure 1: Usual PTT usage scenario

If the transmission is ceased (the PTT button is released) while the audio volume level is still significant (above a defined threshold), it indicates that the user has released the PTT button while still talking (see Figure 2: Unusual PTT usage scenario). Such incident is...