Dismiss
InnovationQ will be updated on Sunday, Oct. 22, from 10am ET - noon. You may experience brief service interruptions during that time.
Browse Prior Art Database

Integrated Elevated Temperature and Fire Event Management in Aerospace Applications Utilizing Adaptive, Thermo-sensitive Mechanisms with Temperature Excursion Detectability while Improving Aerodynamic Efficiency

IP.com Disclosure Number: IPCOM000245892D
Publication Date: 2016-Apr-18
Document File: 6 page(s) / 586K

Publishing Venue

The IP.com Prior Art Database

Related People

Justin C. Mickelsen: INVENTOR [+3]

Abstract

Properly managing heat and preventing fire between the engine and the nacelle has been an important design criterion in the Aerospace propulsion industry. At present both the scenarios: managing heat and preventing fire are dealt with separately. Typically, one system is used for managing heat using static vents - with an aerodynamic penalty - and another is used to prevent fire by using extinguishing agents - with no effort to limit influx of oxygen. There is a need for a simple and more effective system that can handle both scenarios without adversely affecting aerodynamic performance. The proposed method and system allows for a single solution for the both scenarios by using a passive, thermo-mechanical system. The proposed solution doesn't compromise on aerodynamic performance of the aircraft during normal operation and reduces the volume required for fire extinguishing agents for fire suppression.

This text was extracted from a PDF file.
This is the abbreviated version, containing approximately 35% of the total text.

Page 01 of 6

Integrated Elevated Temperature and Fire Event Management in Aerospace Applications Utilizing Adaptive, Thermo-sensitive Mechanisms with Temperature Excursion Detectability while

Improving Aerodynamic Efficiency

Justin C. Mickelsen, Alex Guerinot, Max Warden

ABSTRACT

Properly managing heat and preventing fire between the engine and the nacelle has been an important design criterion in the Aerospace propulsion industry. At present both the scenarios: managing heat and preventing fire are dealt with separately. Typically, one system is used for managing heat using static vents - with an aerodynamic penalty - and another is used to prevent fire by using extinguishing agents - with no effort to limit influx of oxygen. There is a need for a simple and more effective system that can handle both scenarios without adversely affecting aerodynamic performance. The proposed method and system allows for a single solution for the both scenarios by using a passive, thermo-mechanical system. The proposed solution doesn't compromise on aerodynamic performance of the aircraft during normal operation and reduces the volume required for fire extinguishing agents for fire suppression.


1. Introduction & Background

In many aerospace propulsion applications, the gas turbine engine providing thrust to the aircraft is equipped with an aerodynamic nacelle. The cavity between the engine core and the nacelle is used to mount auxiliary equipment such as sensors, tubes and electrical or electronic components. As the gas turbine engine produces a significant amount of heat during operation, temperatures will rise within the nacelle. The equipment within the cavity is usually heat sensitive and can potentially be damaged or prematurely degrade by excessive temperatures unless cooling measures are implemented. Furthermore, in accordance with regulation, fire should be completely avoided inside the cavity and quickly extinguished to prevent serious safety issues.

At present, cooling is provided by a static ventilation system wherein vents direct

1

external cooling air into the nacelle cavity.


Page 02 of 6

For fire suppression, fire extinguishing agents are released in the cavity. However, the ventilation system is still active and allows additional oxygen into the cavity thus "feeding" the fire. Hence the solutions to the two conditions discussed above are in direct conflict.

Additionally, static vents bring with them an aerodynamic performance penalty. Moreover, the vent opening(s) cannot be controlled in present system, leading to more than required air intake for some situations that need only a little air to maintain acceptable temperatures. Also, without additional systems in place, developing conditions whereby the internal nacelle temperature progressively increases over the course of several flights cannot be easily detected. Early detection and preventive maintenance are hindered. The thermal design of engine components is not as simple as keeping the op...