Browse Prior Art Database

The use of laser scanning confocal microscopy (LSCM) to measure flake gaps in paint systems.

IP.com Disclosure Number: IPCOM000245992D
Publication Date: 2016-Apr-22
Document File: 3 page(s) / 212K

Publishing Venue

The IP.com Prior Art Database

This text was extracted from a PDF file.
This is the abbreviated version, containing approximately 50% of the total text.

Page 01 of 3

The use of laser scanning confocal microscopy (LSCM) to quantify flake gaps in silver metallic paints 

The microstructure of a silver metallic paint systems directly affects the appearance of the paint.  The  final microstructure of the basecoat paint layer that contains aluminum flakes is dependent on a range  of formulation and application factors such as platelet size, thickness, volume fraction, bell speed, fluid  flow, and booth temperature, just to name a few.  In many cases, the appearance of a silver metallic  paint can change from part‐to‐part, without any obvious cause.  These part‐to‐part variations create  "color harmony" defects, which have been shown to reduce customer satisfaction and give the  appearance of poor manufacturing quality.    

Laser scanning confocal microscopy (LSCM) is one method that can be used to examine the  microstructure of the flakes contained within a silver metallic paint.  Workers have used this technique  to quantify one important microstructural property of these paint systems, the orientation of the flakes.   However, this technique can also be used to quantify another microstructural property that has not  previously been reported on, but has been found to have a significant effect on the appearance of the  silver metallic paint.  This property is the size and frequency of the gaps between the platelets, which we  have quantified and termed the "gap factor".   
 

Method 

The gap factor can be measured directly from the LSCM data and accounts for a range of issues that can  affect the gap factor quantity, such as the size of individual gaps, the frequency of gaps, and the  exposure of the gaps to incoming light.  An example LSCM scan is shown below in Figure 1, where we 

0 20 40 60 80 100 µm

µm


7.5

7


6.5

6


5.5

5


4.5

4


3.5

3


2.5

2


1.5

1


0.5

0

  0 10 20 30 40 50 60 70 80 90 100 110 µm

 

Figure 1:  LSCM scan of a typical silver metallic paint system.  The dotted line represents where a 2D line scan is  taken and used to calculate the gap factor of this paint system. 


Page 02 of 3

utilize a line scan to extract the necessary data for analysis. 

The line scan obtained from the data presented in Figure 1 is shown below in Figure 2a.  Contained  within this 2D height data are surface roughness and orientation variations as well as height gaps  between the platelets.  These features are highlighted in Figure 2a as well.  To filter out the small  roughness variations and quantify the larger flake gaps, the slope of the line scan was plotted vs. the line  scan position in Figure 2b.  ...