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TECHNIQUE FOR AUTOMATIC BACKUP AND RECOVERY OF CONFIGURATION SETTINGS IN ELECTROCARDIOGRAM (ECG) CARTS

IP.com Disclosure Number: IPCOM000246050D
Publication Date: 2016-Apr-29
Document File: 4 page(s) / 80K

Publishing Venue

The IP.com Prior Art Database

Abstract

A technique for automatic backup and recovery of configuration settings in electrocardiogram (ECG) carts is disclosed. The technique uses storage space available in one sub-system within the ECG cart as backup. For example, a copy of configuration data stored in storage of a main board is communicated and stored in storage of a printer board. Both copies of the configuration data, in the storage of the main board and the storage of the printer board are synchronized such that values of the configuration data are same at all times. Restoration of the configuration data from the copy in the storage of the printer board is initiated under two conditions, when the faulty main board is replaced with the new one and when configuration data of the main board is corrupted. Restoration is initiated automatically by detecting integrity check failure of the configuration data when the configuration data is corrupted or the main board is replaced.

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TECHNIQUE FOR AUTOMATIC BACKUP AND RECOVERY OF CONFIGURATION SETTINGS IN ELECTROCARDIOGRAM (ECG) CARTS

BACKGROUND

 

The present disclosure relates generally to configuration data management of electrocardiogram (ECG) carts and more particularly to a technique for automatic backup and recovery of configuration settings in ECG carts.

Generally, life time of medical devices such as ECG carts is greater than 7 years. In such period, likelihood of faults and failure of electrical boards containing a main processing unit and storage is high. One challenge in repairing or replacing the faulty board is reconfiguring the medical device according to previous configurations. Other than general device settings, there are numerous customer specific configurations. For example, there are more than a hundred configuration specifications for ECG carts. Generally, a copy of the configuration is stored in a storage system outside of the board. This copy is used to restore repaired or replaced board to the previous configuration.

In many instances the copy is stored in a removable storage device such as a Secure Digital (SD) card, multimedia card (MMC), universal serial bus (USB) or a dual in-line memory module (DIMM). A service engineer removes such removable storage device from the faulty board and connects the storage device to the repaired or replaced board and manually initiates configuration restoration process. However, use of the removable storage device suffers various disadvantages. As the removable storage device is electrically connected to the board, there are chances of the storage device also developing fault and failing along with the board. Also, there are issues in electrical contacts when the medical device is subjected to fast movement and vibrations. Protection of confidentiality is another challenge with the removable storage device as it can be easily removed and its contents can be misused or modified. The removable storage device may also get misplaced at the customer site. Obsolescence or non-availability of particular storage devices over the years is another common problem due to fast evolution in the storage device industry.

It would be desirable to have an efficient technique for automatic backup and recovery of configuration settings in ECG carts.

BRIEF DESCRIPTION OF DRAWINGS

Figure 1 depicts the technique for automatic backup and recovery of configuration settings in electrocardiogram (ECG) carts.

DETAILED DESCRIPTION

A technique for automatic backup and recovery of configuration settings in electrocardiogram (ECG) carts is disclosed. The technique uses storage space available in one sub-system within the ECG cart as backup. A typical ECG cart contains at least three sub-systems where all the at least three sub-systems are in a single board (referred to herein as, single board environment) or in separate boards (referred to herein as, multi-board environment). In the multi-board environment, the boards are connected using a uni...