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A TECHNIQUE FOR MINIMIZING NON-ACTIONABLE SpO2 ALARMS IN CARE-GIVING CENTERS

IP.com Disclosure Number: IPCOM000246052D
Publication Date: 2016-Apr-29
Document File: 2 page(s) / 33K

Publishing Venue

The IP.com Prior Art Database

Abstract

A technique for minimizing number of non-actionable SpO2 alarms in care-giving centers is disclosed. The algorithm considers pulse rate and heart rate for determining whether SpO2 saturation level detected is accurate, and whether to call an SpO2 high or SpO2 low alarm. For example, a pulse rate trending within 5-10 beats per minute to that of the heart rate confirms that the SpO2 event is real. Alternatively, if the pulse rate and heart rate diverge, and plethysmographic waveform is not consistent, the algorithm determines the event as an artifact. Accordingly, the technique described herein does not call an alarm on determination of artifact, which using conventional techniques would result in a non-actionable alarm.

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A TECHNIQUE FOR MINIMIZING NON-ACTIONABLE SpO2 ALARMS IN CARE-GIVING CENTERS

BACKGROUND

 

The present disclosure relates generally to arterial oxygen saturation (SpO2) alarms and more particularly to a technique for minimizing number of non-actionable SpO2 alarms in care-giving centers.

One of the challenges in a hospital care area, and especially in Neonatal Intensive Care Unit (NICU) is false alarms from patient monitors. It is generally known that arterial oxygen saturation (SpO2) alarms comprise about 50-85% of all alarms in the NICU, and that majority of these SpO2 alarms are non-actionable alarms.

Non-actionable alarms cause alarm fatigue, and Joint Commission on Accreditation of Healthcare Organizations (JCAHO) has determined that alarm fatigue is a major safety concern in hospitals and other care-giving centers.

Another problem in hospitals and other care-giving centers and especially in the post-anesthesia care unit (PACU) and NICU is noise pollution due to monitor alarms. These alarms have been documents to be developmentally debilitating to both patients and their families. Therefore minimizing number of non-actionable alarms in these areas is much desired.

It would be desirable to have an improved technique for minimizing number of non-actionable SpO2 alarms in care-giving centers.

DETAILED DESCRIPTION

A technique for minimizing number of non-actionable SpO2 alarms in care-giving centers is disclosed. The technique is compatible with most patient monitors generally known in the art. The technique includes an algorithm which considers multiple parameters for determining whether SpO2 saturation level detected is accurate, and whether to call an SpO2 high or SpO2 low alarm.

The algorithm considers pulse rate from a Pulse Oximeter probe, and heart rate captured from the ECG electrodes, for determination. For example, a pulse...