Browse Prior Art Database

Glass Bubble Filled PET Compositions for Food Packaging Containers with Reduced Water Vapor Permeability and Lightweight

IP.com Disclosure Number: IPCOM000246189D
Publication Date: 2016-May-13
Document File: 7 page(s) / 101K

Publishing Venue

The IP.com Prior Art Database

Abstract

Incorporating inorganic filler particles to polymers is a common practice to reduce the permeability to gases, vapors, and liquids3. However, the resulting composites usually suffer from increased densities, due to the significantly higher density of the added inorganic fillers. Incorporating 3M™ glass bubbles (GB) to the polymers used in disposable food packages, will improve the impermeability properties and simultaneously reduce the density of the resulting composites. The described invention provides unique capabilities of GB which combine improved impermeability properties by reduced density.

This text was extracted from a PDF file.
This is the abbreviated version, containing approximately 25% of the total text.

Page 01 of 7

Glass Bubble Filled PET Compositions for Food Packaging Containers with Reduced Water Vapor Permeability and Lightweight

Abstract

Incorporating inorganic filler particles to polymers is a common practice to reduce the permeability to gases, vapors, and liquids3. However, the resulting composites usually suffer from increased densities, due to the significantly higher density of the added inorganic fillers. Incorporating 3M™ glass bubbles (GB) to the polymers used in disposable food packages, will improve the impermeability properties and simultaneously reduce the density of the resulting composites.

The described invention provides unique capabilities of GB which combine improved impermeability properties by reduced density.

Background

Disposable food packages, such as thermoformed freezer-to-oven portion servings and trays are usually made of synthetic polymers, especially of PET, among others. "Crystallized polyethylene terephthalate (CPET) is nearly transparent to microwave energy and can sustain 200oC convection oven temperatures for more than 60 minutes without embrittling. As a result, it is a leading candidate for thermoformed freezer-to-oven portion servings."1 In addition, PET is one of the most widely used polymers in food packaging applications due to its relatively low permeability to oxygen and water vapor2.

PET has a relatively high density (~1.40 g/cc) compared to other common polymers used in food packaging applications, such as polyethylene (0.90-0.96 g/cc) and polypropylene (0.90-
0.92 g/cc). The relatively high density of PET is a major drawback. The following is quoted from the Food Packaging Technology 2.


Page 02 of 7

Incorporating inorganic filler particles to polymers is a common practice to reduce the permeability to gases, vapors, and liquids3. However, the resulting composites usually suffer from increased densities, due to the significantly higher density of the added inorganic fillers. Incorporating 3M™ glass bubbles (GB) to the polymers used in disposable food packages, will improve the impermeability properties and simultaneously reduce the density of the resulting composites.

The described invention provides unique capabilities of GB which combine improved impermeability properties by reduced density.

Experimental

Materials:

General purpose grade PET was obtained from DuPont (under the trade name Crystar® 5005SC292). The grade of 3MTM Glass bubbles was iM30K® which had a density of 0.60 g/cc.

Sample Preparation:

All materials were dried at least for 24 hours in an oven at 110oC prior to melt compounding. Three sets of samples were prepared as follows:

The samples consisted of glass bubble filled PET samples: DuPont Crystar® 5005SC292PET resin was compounded with 3M iM30K Glass Bubbles (GB) in a co-rotating intermeshing 1" twin screw extruder (L/D: 25) (Thermo Electron Corporation) equipped with a side stuffer, water bath and a pelletizer system. The bubbles were introduced using the side st...