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Functionalized Nanocarbon for Selective Removal of Boron from Industrial Waste or Produced Water

IP.com Disclosure Number: IPCOM000246213D
Publication Date: 2016-May-17
Document File: 5 page(s) / 303K

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Abstract

Produced water usually represents a waste product in the petroleum industry, which typically contains hydrocarbons from oil and inorganic salts. Treatment of produced water may be required in order to meet pre-disposal regulatory limits or to meet beneficial use specifications. To develop a practical and cost effective treatment process is a great challenge. In recent years boron in drinking and irrigation waters has become an important issue. As a consequence, the World Health Organization (WHO) recommends a guideline of 0.5 mg/L boron in human drinking water. The US National Academy of Sciences offers upper limits for toxic substances in water of boron content is about 5 mg/L for livestock drinking and for irrigation 2 mg/L. The produced water has significant amount of boron concentration. The boron content in the produced water is from 95 mg/L in the conventional well and 30.6 mg/L in the unconventional well. Here we propose a functionalized nanocarbon material for selective removal of boron.

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Title: Functionalized Nanocarbon for Selective Removal of Boron from Industrial Waste or Produced Water

Abstract: Produced water usually represents a waste product in the petroleum industry, which typically contains hydrocarbons from oil and inorganic salts. Treatment of produced water may be required in order to meet pre-disposal regulatory limits or to meet beneficial use specifications. To develop a practical and cost effective treatment process is a great challenge. In recent years boron in drinking and irrigation waters has become an important issue. As a consequence, the World Health Organization (WHO) recommends a guideline of 0.5 mg/L boron in human drinking water. The US National Academy of Sciences offers upper limits for toxic substances in water of boron content is about 5 mg/L for livestock drinking and for irrigation 2 mg/L. The produced water has significant amount of boron concentration. The boron content in the produced water is from 95 mg/L in the conventional well and 30.6 mg/L in the unconventional well. Here we propose a functionalized nanocarbon material for selective removal of boron.

Description: Different technologies have been developed to remove boron from waste water, which includes 1. Precipitation- coagulation; 2. Adsorption on oxides, active carbon, cellulose or clay minerals; 3. Ion exchange with basic exchanger; 4. Use of boron selective resin; 5. Solvent extraction; 6. Membrane filtration (electrodialysis, reverse osmosis etc.). Current methods for the removal of boron from water are for the most part either ineffective when compared to the required guideline values or prohibitively expensive in terms of energy or cost. As a result effective methods for the removal of boron species from water will undoubtedly have many applications. The boron in aqueous solution exists as boric acid B(OH)3 and or borate anion B(OH)4- based on the pH of the solution. This property of boron has been an obstacle to many treatment methodologies. At a pH lower than 7, boric acid is un-dissociated as H3BO3 or B(OH). At a pH higher than 11.5, boron occurs as dissociated borate [B(OH)4]. In concentrated solution, polymeric ions are formed: Activated carbon is frequently used to purify water. However, the reduction in boron concentration is negligible using activated carbon. To enhance its activity towards boron adsorption, activated carbons were impregnated with salicylic acid, citric acid and tartaric acid and results showed that the amount of boron adsorption has been doubled. The believed mechanism for the enhanced adsorption is as shown below. Boron can be effectively removed from wastewater with boron selective chelating ion exchange resins. Dow Chemicals has introduced boron selective ion exchange resin (AMBERLITE, PWA10) has the chelating resin with carbohydrate as the active functional group. This can reduce the boron level to 0.2 mg/L of boron. The figure below shows the resin composition and the mechanism that...