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SMART INTERDIGIT TIMER FOR DIAL PLAN USER INTERFACE FOR NON-EXPERTS

IP.com Disclosure Number: IPCOM000246283D
Publication Date: 2016-May-23
Document File: 5 page(s) / 24K

Publishing Venue

The IP.com Prior Art Database

Related People

Chris Pearce: AUTHOR [+2]

Abstract

In a telephone system for non-expert administrators, a solution is provided that intelligently modifies dialing timers in conditions where the administrator has inadvertently created routing overlaps mitigates the worst effects of those overlaps.

This text was extracted from a PDF file.
This is the abbreviated version, containing approximately 33% of the total text.

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SMART INTERDIGIT TIMER FOR DIAL PLAN USER INTERFACE FOR NON- EXPERTS

 AUTHORS: Chris Pearce Alberto Montilla

CISCO SYSTEMS, INC.

ABSTRACT

    In a telephone system for non-expert administrators, a solution is provided that intelligently modifies dialing timers in conditions where the administrator has inadvertently created routing overlaps mitigates the worst effects of those overlaps.

DETAILED DESCRIPTION

    Cloud-based telephony systems are commonly used for small and medium businesses, ranging from 10-250 users each. Administrators for small businesses often do not have telephony experience and thus the user interface for the administrative portal has been designed to expose a minimum number of features.

    The dial plan has a deserved reputation for being difficult to manage in telephone systems. One very common issue with the dial plan revolves around cases where a user believes they have fully composed a number but the system does not respond. This results from overlapping addresses requiring the system to implement a dialing timer.

    A dialing timer gives a user time to fully compose the dialed number. For example, the user may be reading the number of a computer screen, business card, entering a number that someone else is announcing, or the dialing number may be entered from memory.

    Dialing timers in existing telephony systems are around 10 seconds long and generally that time period is suitable for well-configured cases. If the timer is too short, the system may try to route the call on incomplete digits and fail. The user would then have to enter the number again from scratch. If the timer is too long, the user thinks there is a problem and sometimes abandons the call. If the user has to frequently dial numbers requiring timeouts, this can become annoying.

Copyright 2016 Cisco Systems, Inc.
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    The dialing timer can also cause problems when the user believes he/she has composed a full address but the system is still waiting. This occurs for valid reasons on international calls. Phone systems cannot possibly know the details of every nation's national numbering plans. The system must wait (though dialing # to route immediately is a strategy power users can employ).

    Sometimes dialing timer problems occur improperly, and the root cause for this is almost always number overlaps. Overlaps can be explained as follows. In setting up a small phone system, you set up three phones with the following extensions:

2140
2141
2142

    The phone system needs to connect to the PSTN. You configure the system such that valid PSTN numbers are 10 digits long and start with the numbers 2-9. One way to represent this is (NXX) XXX-XXXX. A user may complain that any time he dials an extension, the system seems to hang. This is because the system cannot predict the future. A user dials the digits 2142. The system has no way to know if the user is done dialing. The system suspects the user might be intending to dial 2142. But it also wonders if the user...