Dismiss
InnovationQ will be updated on Sunday, Oct. 22, from 10am ET - noon. You may experience brief service interruptions during that time.
Browse Prior Art Database

A METHOD OF CHEMICALLY TREATING A GLASS SUBSTRATE

IP.com Disclosure Number: IPCOM000246303D
Publication Date: 2016-May-26
Document File: 9 page(s) / 69K

Publishing Venue

The IP.com Prior Art Database

Abstract

Glass substrates are widely used for flat panel displays and are, therefore, subject to a variety of processing steps in preparation for use in flat panel displays. Certain processing steps may leave the glass panel with an electrostatic charge (ESC) or an electrostatic discharge (ESD), which may cause the glass substrate to become undesirably "sticky." This may cause the glass substrate to stick to surfaces that the glass substrate comes in contact with, such as substrate plates. To prevent this "stickiness," a surface of the glass substrate may be roughened, by etching, such that the contact area between the glass substrate and the substrate plate is reduced. However, due to advancements in etching processes, it is difficult to remove all traces of the chemical etchant. As a result, ions left over from the etching process can cause various problems over time. Thus, the purpose of the present research is to describe a method of substantially eliminating residue left over from etching processes performed on glass substrates. As described herein, the method includes treating at least one surface of the glass substrate with an alkaline-containing detergent.

This text was extracted from a PDF file.
This is the abbreviated version, containing approximately 21% of the total text.

Page 01 of 9

AMETHOD OF CHEMICALLY TREATING A GLASS SUBSTRATE ABSTRACT

    Glass substrates are widely used for flat panel displays and are, therefore, subject to a variety of processing steps in preparation for use in flat panel displays. Certain processing steps may leave the glass panel with an electrostatic charge (ESC) or an electrostatic discharge (ESD), which may cause the glass substrate to become undesirably "sticky." This may cause the glass substrate to stick to surfaces that the glass substrate comes in contact with, such as substrate plates. To prevent this "stickiness," a surface of the glass substrate may be roughened, by etching, such that the contact area between the glass substrate and the substrate plate is reduced. However, due to advancements in etching processes, it is difficult to remove all traces of the chemical etchant. As a result, ions left over from the etching process can cause various problems over time. Thus, the purpose of the present research is to describe a method of substantially eliminating residue left over from etching processes performed on glass substrates. As described herein, the method includes treating at least one surface of the glass substrate with an alkaline- containing detergent.

BACKGROUND &SUMMARY

    Glass substrates are widely used for flat panel displays. For example, liquid crystal displays (LCDs) are generally made of a very thin layer of liquid crystalline that is sandwiched between two glass backplanes (i.e., glass substrates). The backplanes generally include a thin film transistor (TFT) backplane and a color-filter (CF) backplane. Backplanes for LCDs and OLEDs (organic light-emitting diodes) may be made of alkali-free glass (i.e., the glass does not contain alkali metal oxides).

1


Page 02 of 9

    The glass substrates used as backplanes for LCDs need to have a high strain point because these glass substrates are heated up to hundreds of degrees Celsius during film forming processes or annealing. However, shrinkage caused by heat should be minimized. Other requirements of LCD backplanes include: (1) inertness of glass (i.e., stability against chemicals, such as acidic solutions used during photolithographic etch processing steps); (2) glass surface cleanness and stability (e.g., foreign materials/particles should be avoided on the glass surface, and the glass surface should be stable during long periods of storage before use); and (3) the amount electrostatic charge (ESC) or electrostatic discharge (ESD) and "stickiness" on substrate plates are also considered.

    During processing, glass substrates, and TFT backplanes especially, are subjected to high temperature processing. The ESC/ESD and "stickiness" may be the result of this high temperature processing. To eliminate these issues, one of the known techniques is the roughen one of the surfaces of the glass substrate to reduce the contact area between the glass substrate and the substrate plate on which the glass substrate is contacted. Etchin...