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NETWORK MANAGEMENT AND USER INTERFACE FOR PROVISIONING AND RESTORING FLEXIBLE GRID SPECTRAL EFFICIENT WAVELENGTH SERVICES

IP.com Disclosure Number: IPCOM000246334D
Publication Date: 2016-May-31
Document File: 23 page(s) / 7M

Publishing Venue

The IP.com Prior Art Database

Abstract

The present disclosure describes a provisioning application which provides network management and a user interface for provisioning and restoring flexible grid spectral efficient wavelength services, such as in an optical network. The provisioning application presents these complexities to the user in a simple but legible way that provides the user with simple abstractions and default values that allow a simplified mode of operations for the typical day to day network operations. The provisioning application concentrates on deriving a simplified user interface for complicated layer 0 flexible grid, and spectrally efficient optical service turn up that allows typical users to trigger hassle free service provisioning, as well as, allows advanced users to tweak additional parameters to attain the optimal usage of flexible grid solutions. This disclosure focuses on the usability and requirements that can be used both in nodal and in network level rather than concentrating on the exact layout of those parameters on the interface.

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 NETWORK MANAGEMENT AND USER INTERFACE FOR PROVISIONING AND RESTORING FLEXIBLE GRID SPECTRAL EFFICIENT WAVELENGTH SERVICES

ABSTRACT


[0001]The present disclosure describes a provisioning application which provides network management and a user interface for provisioning and restoring flexible grid spectral efficient wavelength services, such as in an optical network. The provisioning application presents these complexities to the user in a simple but legible way that provides the user with simple abstractions and default values that allow a simplified mode of operations for the typical day to day network operations. The provisioning application concentrates on deriving a simplified user interface for complicated layer 0 flexible grid, and spectrally efficient optical service turn up that allows typical users to trigger hassle free service provisioning, as well as, allows advanced users to tweak additional parameters to attain the optimal usage of flexible grid solutions. This disclosure focuses on the usability and requirements that can be used both in nodal and in network level rather than concentrating on the exact layout of those parameters on the interface.

BACKGROUND


[0002]There are existing provisioning applications available for Layer 1 interfaces (e.g., Time Division Multiplexing (TDM) such as Optical Transport Network (OTN) or the like) and fixed grid Layer 0 services (wavelengths such as spaced on the ITU-T wavelength grid, see ITU- T G.694-1 "Spectral grids for WDM applications: DWDM frequency grid" (02/12), the contents of which are incorporated by reference). Newly emerging flexible grid spacing (also defined in ITU-T G.694-1) introduces additional complexity in provisioning, managing, and restoring. Existing provisioning applications are not capable of handling such complexity. Specifically, the flexible grid does not have the fixed relationship between channels and wavelength location. Conventional management approaches rely on manual spreadsheets. Additionally, for service routing and restoration, grouping and co-routing services exists in Layer 1 (TDM), but there are significant differences with Layer 0 and flexible grid.


[0003]Conventionally, users are knowledgeable to provision individual layer 0 services that are typically gridded in fixed ITU specified grid and can follow implicit or explicitly defined routes. The concept of grouping or co-routing multiple services together exists in Layer 1. However, the complexity is, service provisioning in Layer 1 and in Layer 0 is not the same, and Layer 0 comes with its unique level of constraints and complexity. Such constraints include path viability, spectrum availability, and most importantly, adding bi-directional optical signals at their optimal launch power levels at different fiber spans end-to-end over the path to obtain the traffic continuity. While users are still familiar with those Layer 0 constraints in service provisioning, the introduction of spectrall...