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Method and Apparatus for Cooling Hydrogen during Dispensing

IP.com Disclosure Number: IPCOM000246347D
Publication Date: 2016-Jun-01
Document File: 3 page(s) / 23K

Publishing Venue

The IP.com Prior Art Database

Abstract

A method and apparatus for cooling hydrogen during dispensing in which hydrogen is cooled by a coolant in a cooling bath, the coolant circulated through a coolant loop where the flow rate of coolant is increased during hydrogen 5 dispensing using a variable speed pump and/or additional pumps.

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Page 01 of 3

TITLE

Method and Apparatus for Cooling Hydrogen during Dispensing

ABSTRACT


[0001] A method and apparatus for cooling hydrogen during dispensing in which hydrogen is cooled by a coolant in a cooling bath, the coolant circulated through a coolant loop where the flow rate of coolant is increased during hydrogen dispensing

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using a variable speed pump and/or additional pumps.

DESCRIPTION


[0002] The present disclosure relates to dispensing of hydrogen into a receiving vessel and more particularly to a method and apparatus for cooling hydrogen during dispensing.

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[0003] Because of the interrelationship between the temperature, pressure, and density of gases, the amount of hydrogen, H2, that can safely be introduced into a receiving vessel, such as a vehicle storage tank, during refueling necessarily depends upon factors such as the volume, design pressure, and temperature of the receiving vessel, and the temperature and pressure of the compressed gas inside the tank.

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Industry convention sets the pressure rating for H2 fuel tanks at the standard temperature of 15 degrees Celsius, so nominal pressure ratings such as 250 bar (25 MPa), 350 bar
(35 MPa), 500 bar (50 MPa) and 700 bar (70 MPa), correspond to an internal gas temperature of 15 degrees Celsius.


[0004] During rapid refueling of hydrogen, the internal tank temperature will typically

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rise about 50 degrees Celsius due to adiabatic compression of the gas and the reverse Joule-Thompson effect. After the tank is filled, the temperature and pressure inside the tank will decrease as the gas cools, which may result in a less than complete fill. Wide variations in ambient temperature above or below the standard condition of 15 degrees Celsius can also have a significant effect on the indicated pressure inside the tank during

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and after refueling.

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[0005] It is desirable to provide a complete fill. A complete fill is when the receiving vessel contains gas at its target pressure and target temperature after coming to equilibrium with its surroundings.


[0006] Since receiving vessels have temperature ratings, it may be desirable to limit the receiving vessel gas temperature during dispensing.

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[0007] It is known, therefore, to cool the hydrogen during dispensing, as for example from US 6,619,336, US 8,020,589, US 9,261,238, US 2010/0044020, and US 2015/0345705, all incorporated herein by reference. It is known to cool the hydrogen using a large thermal mass, for example, from one or more large blocks of aluminum. It is also known to use a bath of cold liquid solutions, for example, a brine solution to cool

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the hydrogen during dispensing.


[0008] During hydrogen dispensing, heat is transferred from the hydrogen to the thermal mass, aluminum block or bath of cold liquid, thereby cooling the hydrogen to a desi...