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Helium Pulse Detection for Seal & Caprock Integrity While Drilling-SmartApp

IP.com Disclosure Number: IPCOM000246469D
Publication Date: 2016-Jun-09
Document File: 2 page(s) / 15K

Publishing Venue

The IP.com Prior Art Database

Abstract

Helium particles become trapped in low porosity and low permeability (tight) rock. There is a constant feed of Helium through isotopic decay of Uranium in cratonic rocks. After it is formed, Helium doesn't react with other components. It is an inert, noble gas, which has a terminal velocity when released. Its escape tendency may be due to its closed electronic shell and repulsion that comes from the volume occupied in a rock and its release due to drilling activities. The idea of this tool is to use Helium as a tracer to indicate the effectiveness and location of a seal or cap rock while drilling. Helium has a unique characteristic, unlike other gases that stream from a formation, in that it creates a noise in a certain frequency when released. That noise can be detected with the proper equipment downhole. Should a pulse of helium be detected, having been released from the tight rock, while drilling, this can identify the seal or caprock and this would resolve the uncertainty for the location of the top and fault seal and further confirm the seal-controlled column height predictions from the pre-drill interpretation. Additionally, if drilling direction can be controlled, one may be able to steer the drilling into an area more favorable where a pulse can be witnessed and thereby identifying a seal. Following the seal, the next body would be the reservoir. A seal's location and depth should be marked as a system of record for subsequent wells in the field. If no pulse is detected in what was anticipated to be the seal, pre-drill, then the seal has been blown or the initial interpretation of that seal location was incorrect and further drilling in the area should be scrutinized. A seal on top of the reservoir is tantamount to finding the hydrocarbons. If a migration of hydrocarbons has previously occurred as a result of a breach in the seal, no helium pulse would be detected while drilling. Knowing this would save a lot of money in planning wells in the area. A pulse of helium during drilling would also help with identifying and map the seal-controlled column height, any structural reservoir compartmentalization, and stratigraphic characterization of oil and gas shale's. Captured by a smart application. located behind the bit. The delocalization of the Helium atoms may be captured by the detector which captures the bubble dynamics upon release. These data would then be relayed, in real time to the surface.

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Title:  Helium Pulse Detection for Seal & Caprock Integrity While Drilling-SmartApp

Abstract:  Helium particles become trapped in low porosity and low permeability (tight) rock. There is a constant feed of Helium through isotopic decay of Uranium in cratonic rocks. After it is formed, Helium doesn't react with other components.  It is an inert, noble gas, which has a terminal velocity when released. Its escape tendency may be due to its closed electronic shell and repulsion that comes from the volume occupied in a rock and its release due to drilling activities. The idea of this tool is to use Helium as a tracer to indicate the effectiveness and location of a seal or cap rock while drilling. Helium has a unique characteristic, unlike other gases that stream from a formation, in that it creates a noise in a certain frequency when released. That noise can be detected with the proper equipment downhole. Should a pulse of helium be detected, having been released from the tight rock, while drilling, this can identify the seal or caprock and this would resolve the uncertainty for the location of the top and fault seal and further confirm the seal-controlled column height predictions from the pre-drill interpretation. Additionally, if drilling direction can be controlled, one may be able to steer the drilling into an area more favorable where a pulse can be witnessed and thereby identifying a seal. Following the seal, the next body would be the reservoir. A seal's location and depth should be marked as a system of record for subsequent wells in the field. If no pulse is detected in what was anticipated to be the seal, pre-drill, then the seal has been blown or the initial interpretation of that seal location was incorrect and further drilling in the area should be scrutinized. A seal on top of the reservoir is tantamount to finding the hydrocarbons. If a migration of hydrocarbons has previously occurred as a result of a breach in the seal, no helium pulse would be detected while drilling. Knowing this would save a lot of money in planning wells in the area. A pulse of helium during drilling would also help with identifying and map the seal-controlled column height, any structural reservoir compartmentalization, and stratigraphic characterization of oil and gas shale’s.  Captured by a smart application. located behind t...