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Leveraging Low Cost Body Models for Personal Care Product Evaluation

IP.com Disclosure Number: IPCOM000246507D
Publication Date: 2016-Jun-14
Document File: 8 page(s) / 961K

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The IP.com Prior Art Database

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Chris Pieper: AUTHOR

Abstract

Simulating the human body is complex, and detailed models have been used to describe aspects of its physiology. Examples of applications include simulated crash tests, joint replacements and even a modeling of a beating heart. When evaluating a product interacting with the body, the body may not be the primary analysis objective, but rather is a necessary participant in the simulation. Disposable personal care products, such as absorbent incontinence garments or feminine care offerings, often interact intimately with the body and are intended to fit a range of body sizes and shapes. Virtual evaluations of these products often consider many body sizes and shapes; however, the cost of complex human models for product evaluation can limit the number of use cases considered. Here, cost refers to the price and resource expense of obtaining geometry, creating a finite element definition and the computation of the model. This paper describes techniques used to provide low cost virtual articulated humans suitable for product evaluation.

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  Leveraging Low Cost Body Models for Personal Care Product Evaluation

Chris Pieper

Kimberly-Clark Corporation

Abstract: Simulating the human body is complex, and detailed models have been used to describe aspects of its physiology. Examples of applications include simulated crash tests, joint replacements and even a modelling of a beating heart. When evaluating a product interacting with the body, the body may not be the primary analysis objective, but rather is a necessary participant in the simulation. Disposable personal care products, such as absorbent incontinence garments or feminine care offerings, often interact intimately with the body and are intended to fit a range of body sizes and shapes. Virtual evaluations of these products often consider many body sizes and shapes; however, the cost of complex human models for product evaluation can limit the number of use cases considered. Here, cost refers to the price and resource expense of obtaining geometry, creating a finite element definition and the computation of the model. This paper describes techniques used to provide low cost virtual articulated humans suitable for product evaluation.

The advent of faster, simpler yet sufficiently accurate body models allows evaluation of virtual products over more realistic human user populations. This allows personal care product models to put more focus on performance of the product, which is the true goal of virtual product evaluation. By contrast previous capabilities requiring significant computational and body model building resources, resulted in limited testing over a small user population. Faster and simpler models permit more virtual product tests in a given time allowing consideration of both common and less common body shapes/sizes. Consideration of more product users provides greater confidence in the product’s design as it progresses through the development cycle.

The examples featured leverage high quality digital bodies generated by a body model commercialized by BodyLabs, Inc. Using a statistical model (SMPL) to provide high quality virtual human shapes in multiple poses eliminates the effort and challenges associated with converting scan data into a usable finite element model. Further, the simplified approach of defining an articulated skeleton, or other internal features/properties, in Abaqus as node sets rather than as discrete regions provides a means to represent complex internal composition in a computationally efficient manner while maintaining the essence of internal complexity. Another application uses poseable body model output to define a global model and eliminates the need to represent much of the internal body detail altogether. Several examples highlighting the benefits of these techniques are provided to further illustrate the concepts and their advantages.

Keywords: Body Model, Virtual Prototype, Statistical Body Model, SMPL, Virtual Product Testing, Nodal Material Specification.

1.      Introduction

Finite elem...