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Improving Chart Accessibility by Presenting Chart Information in Slices

IP.com Disclosure Number: IPCOM000246594D
Publication Date: 2016-Jun-20
Document File: 3 page(s) / 134K

Publishing Venue

The IP.com Prior Art Database

Abstract

Disclosed is a method to introduce a movable, user configurable chart slicer into a graphical presentation to effectively present the data to visually impaired users.

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Improving Chart Accessibility by Presenting Chart Information in Slices

Making charts accessible to visually impaired people can be straightforward when dealing with discrete data such as those typically found in a bar chart or a pie chart; however, charts with continuous data it can be challenging. Reading every point in a scatterplot or every point on a line chart can easily overwhelm the user, and can be impossible if the chart has truly continuous axes having an infinite number of points between any two points. Although a human being may be able to give a reasonable

description, having an automatic description can be very difficult.

The novel solution is a method to introduce a movable, user configurable chart slicer into the chart to effectively present the data to visually impaired users. This format allows the user to discover information on small sections of the chart to more easily understand the visual representation of the overall chart. The user can configure the height and width of the slice as well as which information each slice presents.

The user initially creates a chart slicer object to overlay a portion of the chart. This slicer can chop the chart up into vertical or horizontal slices, or both. The slicer can be customized to present more or less data. The user can also configure the slicer to provide information about the data underlying the slicer at the given point (e.g., the X-and Y-axis minimum and maximum values in that slice, the number of points, the average slope of a line in the slice, etc.)

Figure 1: In this example, the user created a 16-week wide slice (X-a...