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Modular Composite GBSs

IP.com Disclosure Number: IPCOM000246663D
Publication Date: 2016-Jun-24
Document File: 2 page(s) / 112K

Publishing Venue

The IP.com Prior Art Database

Abstract

Various investigations of concrete platforms for high Arctic locations demonstrate that, given extreme Arctic conditions and often low soil capacities, dimensions of Arctic concrete Gravity Based Structures (GBS) are significantly larger than is the case with non-Arctic concrete GBSs. Such a large GBS footprint requires use of very large dry docks, which are currently not available. To address this issue, an approach of using smaller modular GBS sub-assemblages is proposed herein.

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Modular Composite GBSs

Abstract

Various investigations of concrete platforms for high Arctic locations demonstrate that, given extreme Arctic conditions and often low soil capacities, dimensions of Arctic concrete Gravity Based Structures (GBS) are significantly larger than is the case with non-Arctic concrete GBSs.  Such a large GBS footprint requires use of very large dry docks, which are currently not available.  To address this issue, an approach of using smaller modular GBS sub-assemblages is proposed herein. 

Concept Description

Various investigations of concrete platforms for high Arctic locations demonstrate that, given extreme Arctic conditions and often low soil capacities, dimensions of Arctic concrete Gravity Based Structures (GBS) are significantly larger than is the case with non-Arctic concrete GBSs.  For example, parametric investigations indicate that necessary dimensions of a high Arctic GBS would be larger than 180m by 180m or even 200m by 200m.  Such a large GBS footprint requires use of very larger dry docks which are currently not available.

To address this issue, an approach of using smaller modular GBS sub-assemblages is proposed herein. For example, a modular “brick” (see Figure 1) having approximately 50m by 150m footprint can be constructed with or without a shaft in a conventional dry dock.  Once completed, the modular “bricks” are floated and mated using the same mating methods currently deployed for mating floating concrete bridges and docks.  By mating modular members, GBSs with various footprints can be created, starting with a simple “doughnut” shape or using a more complex geometries (see Figure 2). 

It should be noted that, in addition to allowing the use of conventional size dry docks, other benefits of modularization include:

o  The use of (typically) repetitive modules, which can be performed “serially”, reducing the number of equipment needed and allowing for a more efficient production after a short learning start-up period.

o  Possible concurrent construction of multiple modules through the use of multiple...