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A BRIDGE-BASED MOUNTING METHOD FOR BODY COIL TUBE

IP.com Disclosure Number: IPCOM000246850D
Publication Date: 2016-Jul-07
Document File: 6 page(s) / 258K

Publishing Venue

The IP.com Prior Art Database

Abstract

A short radiofrequency (RF) body coil tube and bridge design in a magnetic resonance (MR) system is disclosed. The RF body coil tube and bridge are integrated together and mounting parts only connect to the bridge. As a result, length limit for RF body coil tube does not exist as it is not necessary for the RF body coil tube to connect directly to the mounting parts. An embodiment of the invention includes techniques for mounting the RF body coil tube and the bridge in an integrated manner. One of the techniques includes modifying a mandrel with additional grooves. Then, the rail type bridge is fabricated together with the RF body coil tube. Another technique includes fabricating the bridge and the RF body coil tube separately, and then connecting them together by non-magnetic screws. The two rails are used as bridge to provide strength that is enough to support load from cradle, patient and the body coil tube.

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A BRIDGE-BASED MOUNTING METHOD FOR BODY COIL TUBE

BACKGROUND

The present invention relates generally to a magnetic resonance (MR) system and more particularly to a radiofrequency (RF) body coil tube and bridge design and a bridge based technique for mounting the RF body coil tube.

Generally, in a magnetic resonance (MR) system, a radiofrequency (RF) body coil is used to generate RF field for MR imaging. The RF body coil is located in inside of a magnet bore and either mounted on a magnet flange or rests on inner surface of a gradient coil. The gradient coil vibrates during MR scan. Therefore, the RF body coil is mounted on the magnet flange to avoid direct contact with the gradient coil.

In order to mount RF parts to generate sufficient RF field, length of a RF body coil tube requires to cover a limited space. However, to mount the RF body coil onto the magnet flange, length of RF body coil tube is required to match length of the magnet, which results in additional length or weight and cost of the RF body coil tube. The RF body coil tube is usually made of composite material with good strength and rigidity. In case the RF body coil tube is required to match length of the magnet as a single piece part, extra length of the tube is built for mounting purpose and to form a complete magnet bore for patient experience.

In a conventional MR system, a patient is transported into magnet bore by a cradle. A bridge is used to provide rail on which the cradle rides. The bridge is also mounted on the magnet flange along with the RF body coil tube. In case the bridge and the RF body coil tube are independently mounted on magnet flange, there are two sets of hard mounting parts on magnet flange which introduce more parts, additional expense and more installation work. Figure 1 depicts an MR system design in which the bridge and the body coil tube are independently mounted on the magnet flange.

Figure 1

In case the bridge rails are mounted on the RF body coil tube, the RF body coil tube is required to be long and strong enough to support extra load from patient, cradle and coils. As a result, more weight, additional expense and degradation in serviceability are introduced in the MR system. Figure 2 depicts the MR system design in which integrated bridge body coil is mounted on the magnet flange.

Figure 2

In another conventional MR system design, that includes integrated bridge and RF body coil, the bridge is replaced by two rails. The rails support cradle to move inside or outside the magnet bore. Such a design eliminates using bridge, however, the body coil is very long and heavy and directly connected to mount bracket parts. Figure 3 depicts the conventional MR system design as described above, with integrated bridge and RF body coil.

Figure 3

A conventional technique includes a bridge mounting mechanism. An apparatus is arranged at two sides of the magnet and connected to the bridge. Such a design decreases deflection and deformation of the bridge when th...