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Benefits of Silicone Acrylate Technologies to Protect Skin against Pollution

IP.com Disclosure Number: IPCOM000246856D
Publication Date: 2016-Jul-07
Document File: 16 page(s) / 4M

Publishing Venue

The IP.com Prior Art Database

Abstract

Silicone acrylates have been used in the personal care market for several years. These materials are based on a polyacrylate backbone having dendritic silicone side chains and have been used in a variety of applications, although most developed in color cosmetics and skin care. The present research disclosure demonstrates the potential benefits of silicone acrylate technologies to protect skin against environmental pollutants when incorporated in cosmetic regimes dedicated to both skin care and hair care. As demonstrated in a related research disclosure (IPCOM000239161D), silicone acrylate technologies form flexible films with strong adhesion properties on keratinous surfaces, making finished cosmetic formulations last longer on skin or hair fibers. Thanks to both their unique chemical composition and their outstanding film-forming attributes, silicone acrylate technologies can act as a barrier film that reduces the impact of pollution on skin and hair fibers, by limiting the adhesion of pollution particles on keratinous surfaces and by limiting the oxidation cascade generated in the skin by pollutants such as ozone, cigarette smoke and diesel exhaust. Such benefits of silicone acrylates can be obtained even when diluted with a variety of dilution carriers, such as but not limited to cyclopentasiloxane, isododecane, volatile dimethicone and water. As well as from a wide range of product types – such as but not limited to o/w emulsions, w/o emulsions, anhydrous systems respectively and product applications – such as but not limited to color cosmetics, skin care, sun care, hair care, hygiene products, anti-perspirants/deodorants and topical healthcare creams respectively.

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Benefits of Silicone Acrylate Technologies to Protect Skin against Pollution

Authors:

Marc Eeman, Jean-Luc Garaud (Dow Corning Europe S.A., Seneffe, Belgium)

Paul Pretzer (Dow Corning Corporation, Midland, Michigan, USA)

Isabelle Van Reeth (Dow Corning (China) Holding Co., Shanghai, RPC)

Abstract

Silicone acrylates have been used in the personal care market for several years. These materials are based on a polyacrylate backbone having dendritic silicone side chains and have been used in a variety of applications, although most developed in color cosmetics and skin care. The present research disclosure demonstrates the potential benefits of silicone acrylate technologies to protect skin against environmental pollutants when incorporated in cosmetic regimes dedicated to both skin care and hair care. As demonstrated in a related research disclosure (IPCOM000239161D), silicone acrylate technologies form flexible films with strong adhesion properties on keratinous surfaces, making finished cosmetic formulations last longer on skin or hair fibers. Thanks to both their unique chemical composition and their outstanding film-forming attributes, silicone acrylate technologies can act as a barrier film that reduces the impact of pollution on skin and hair fibers, by limiting the adhesion of pollution particles on keratinous surfaces and by limiting the oxidation cascade generated in the skin by pollutants such as ozone, cigarette smoke and diesel exhaust. Such benefits of silicone acrylates can be obtained even when diluted with a variety of dilution carriers, such as but not limited to cyclopentasiloxane, isododecane, volatile dimethicone and water. As well as from a wide range of product types – such as but not limited to o/w emulsions, w/o emulsions, anhydrous systems respectively and product applications – such as but not limited to color cosmetics, skin care, sun care, hair care, hygiene products, anti-perspirants/deodorants and topical healthcare creams respectively.

Introduction

A major function of the skin other than its biological function is to provide a protective barrier against environmental factors that physically and/or chemically can alter their function. The stratum corneum (SC), the outermost layer of the skin, is the principal component of the cutaneous barrier. It forms a chemical barrier against the entry of environmental contaminants, including ambient particulate matters, as well as pathogens and allergens. It also acts as a physical barrier controlling the percutaneous absorption of substances reaching the skin surface and protects the body from dehydration by changing the boundary conditions, thus reducing the driving force for water and salt transepidermal loss.

Obviously, the protective ability of the skin is not unlimited, and cutaneous problems arise when an increased exposure to environmental stressors exceeds the skin’s normal defensive potential. Because of its critical location, the skin is continuously exposed not...