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Mechanical Removal of Non-stick Coating

IP.com Disclosure Number: IPCOM000246868D
Publication Date: 2016-Jul-08
Document File: 1 page(s) / 8K

Publishing Venue

The IP.com Prior Art Database

Abstract

Using energy based instruments to cut and seal tissue during surgery has been a standard for many years. A common problem accompanying the use of energy is the resultant tissue sticking to the electrodes of the instruments during and after activation. Non-stick electrodes have become an important requirement of energy based surgical devices. Ensuring maximum sealing from the instrument without the possibility of stressing the tissue during instrument removal is a key to providing the clinician with a process requiring less touch up and/or seal site repair.

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Mechanical Removal of Non-stick Coating

Abstract:


Using energy based instruments to cut and seal tissue during surgery has been a standard for many years. A common problem accompanying the use of energy is the resultant tissue sticking to the electrodes of the instruments during and after activation. Non-stick electrodes have become an important requirement of energy based surgical devices. Ensuring maximum sealing from the instrument without the possibility of stressing the tissue during instrument removal is a key to providing the clinician with a process requiring less touch up and/or seal site repair.

Description:

To produce a non-stick electrode, a coating must be applied. The issue with non-stick coatings is that their insulating properties inhibit the flow of energy. Portions of the electrode must be void of the coating to allow for energy conductance between the tissue and electrode. One solution to reduce sticking is to restrict the surface area of the electrode's contact with the tissue. Various patterns of coatings can be developed to maximize the flow of energy while minimizing the contact area.

Problem solved:

Coatings can be applied by many processes (i.e., painted, spraying, dipped, etc.). All of these processes would require some sort of masking to allow for the desired pattern to be achieved. Masking can be completed before the coating process to prevent the coating from reaching the areas used for current flow, or after the coating process to p...