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Force Limiting Trigger

IP.com Disclosure Number: IPCOM000246869D
Publication Date: 2016-Jul-08
Document File: 5 page(s) / 225K

Publishing Venue

The IP.com Prior Art Database

Abstract

Stalwart physicians can apply enough trigger force, to damage, destroy, or over-ride the components and safety features of a medical device during a surgical procedure. This can cause safety concerns, including loose parts, temporary or permanent disabling of the device, or in a worst case scenario, enable a device to cut tissue without staples to seal the cut tissues or vessels. A range of firing loads can be predicted on a variety of tissues under normal load conditions. Many surgical staplers/cutters have a staple cartridge that is loaded into a surgical stapler, and the cartridges include safety features (lockouts) to prevent the clinician from firing the device with a "spent" cartridge (empty and without staples). This lockout, however, does not prevent the clinician from attempting a subsequent firing, and delivering large and potentially damaging forces through the device trigger/lever into the drive train and to the distal portion of the device, which may be in contact with vital tissues inside a patient. The trigger lever, and/or other element of the drive train can be configured to mitigate potential safety concerns via several embodiments described below, which generally comprise intentional yield points, analogous to a fuse in an electrical circuit, and which create a "fail safe" condition.

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Title: Force Limiting Trigger Summary

Stalwart physicians can apply enough trigger force, to damage, destroy, or over-ride the components and safety features of a medical device during a surgical procedure. This can cause safety concerns, including loose parts, temporary or permanent disabling of the device, or in a worst case scenario, enable a device to cut tissue without staples to seal the cut tissues or vessels.

A range of firing loads can be predicted on a variety of tissues under normal load conditions. Many surgical staplers/cutters have a staple cartridge that is loaded into a surgical stapler, and the cartridges include safety features (lockouts) to prevent the clinician from firing the device with a "spent" cartridge (empty and without staples). This lockout, however, does not prevent the clinician from attempting a subsequent firing, and delivering large and potentially damaging forces through the device trigger/lever into the drive train and to the distal portion of the device, which may be in contact with vital tissues inside a patient.

The trigger lever, and/or other element of the drive train can be configured to mitigate potential safety concerns via several embodiments described below, which generally comprise intentional yield points, analogous to a fuse in an electrical circuit, and which create a "fail safe" condition.

Description

One method incorporates a force limiting feature built into the trigger. As shown in Figure's 1-3, this feature allows the Trigger to flex or collapse when a certain firing force is reached. This is an indicator to the clinician that something is wrong, and cues him/her to investigate. The flexure also...