Dismiss
InnovationQ will be updated on Sunday, Oct. 22, from 10am ET - noon. You may experience brief service interruptions during that time.
Browse Prior Art Database

SAFELY UNPLUG A FULL POWER PAYLOAD IN A DIRECT CURRENT DISTRIBUTION SYSTEM

IP.com Disclosure Number: IPCOM000246909D
Publication Date: 2016-Jul-13

Publishing Venue

The IP.com Prior Art Database

Abstract

"A DC (Direct Current) distribution system can be used to safely unplug a full power payload of a high power payload tray by sequentially ramping down electric current at the high power payload tray. The high power payload tray connects at full power to a power source, and the DC distribution system determines if the high power payload tray starts to disconnect from the power source. If disconnection starts, then the system gradually ramps down the current at the high power payload tray. If the disconnection does not start, then the system again checks if the high power payload tray starts to disconnect from the power source."

This text was extracted from a PDF file.
This is the abbreviated version, containing approximately 23% of the total text.

Page 01 of 13

SAFELY UNPLUG A FULL POWER PAYLOAD IN A DIRECT CURRENT DISTRIBUTION  SYSTEM 

 

ABSTRACT 

    A DC (Direct Current) distribution system can be used to safely unplug a full power  payload of a high power payload tray by sequentially ramping down electric current at the high  power payload tray. The high power payload tray connects at full power to a power source, and  the DC distribution system determines if the high power payload tray starts to disconnect from  the power source. If disconnection starts, then the system gradually ramps down the current at  the high power payload tray. If the disconnection does not start, then the system again checks if  the high power payload tray starts to disconnect from the power source. 

 
PROBLEM STATEMENT 

A data center is a centralized repository for storage, management, and dissemination of 

computer data. ​

C​

onventionally, a data center receives power from the power grid as AC 

(Alternating Current) power and a power distribution unit distributes the AC power throughout 

the data center's infrastructure. However, most of the electrical equipment, such as servers, 

solid­state disks for storage, and other IT equipments, within the infrastructure work on DC 

power. To reduce power conversion steps, high­voltage DC power distribution benefits data 

centers. 

Traditionally, ​

most data center's equipment is in the form of servers mounted in 19 inch 

rack cabinets, which are usually placed in single rows forming corridors. The racks include 


Page 02 of 13

payload trays of specific load values. ​

In DC power distribution­based data centers, a 

custom­built data center may have a high power payload tray connected adjacent to a low power 

payload tray. ​

Problems occur when the high power payload tray (e.g., 4000 Watt) unplugs at 

approximately full power load (negative load step) from the DC power distribution in a rack (for 

example, connected at +48V) such that the adjacent low power payload tray (e.g., 1600 Watt) 

fails. The unplugged high power payload tray can be referred to as an aggressor and the adjacent 

       power tray as a victim. The failure happens due to presence of residual current in a  rack bus bar and shelf parasitic inductance that injects into the victim making victim's hot swap  controller react to over current event. Another reason may be that the negative load step causes a  voltage overshoot in the DC power distribution of the rack which makes other systems respond  to the voltage overshoot. 

failing low 

There are several approaches to the problem of victim tray f...