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ENHANCED OUTGOING CALL EXPERIENCE

IP.com Disclosure Number: IPCOM000247026D
Publication Date: 2016-Jul-27
Document File: 5 page(s) / 78K

Publishing Venue

The IP.com Prior Art Database

Related People

Maren Skyrudsmoen: AUTHOR [+2]

Abstract

Presented herein are techniques for providing contextual information about a callee to a caller during or after an attempted call to the callee. The contextual information may let a caller know that a callee is a meeting, on the move, in a different time zone, or other such information so that the caller can adjust his or her expectations and better determine how to proceed (e.g., whether or not to call again). When the caller knows this contextual information, the caller's experienced will be improved and the callee is less likely to be unnecessarily bothered.

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ENHANCED OUTGOING CALL EXPERIENCE

  AUTHORS: Maren Skyrudsmoen Vigleik Norheim

CISCO SYSTEMS, INC.

ABSTRACT

    Presented herein are techniques for providing contextual information about a callee to a caller during or after an attempted call to the callee. The contextual information may let a caller know that a callee is a meeting, on the move, in a different time zone, or other such information so that the caller can adjust his or her expectations and better determine how to proceed (e.g., whether or not to call again). When the caller knows this contextual information, the caller's experienced will be improved and the callee is less likely to be unnecessarily bothered.

DETAILED DESCRIPTION

     When placing a video call in a software client or on a video endpoint, a first user (the caller) places a call to another user (the callee) and waits for the callee to answer. Typically, as the caller waits, the only information displayed to the caller is the contact information for the callee. Consequently, callers often become less patient as they wait (e.g., patience fades with each ring) without any knowledge of what is happening at the far-end (e.g., the callee's environment). If the callee does not pick up, the caller may, out of frustration or for lack of another option, simply call again. However, if the callee is busy or unable to answer (e.g., in a meeting, on the move in a noisy environment, trying to work without being disturbed etc.), the persistent calls may be disturbing and/or annoying. The calls may also create a nuisance in the far-end environment if the callee's device is ringing when the callee is absent or busy. In some situations, a caller may receive some sort of busy signal or notifications; however, this signal or notification may not discourage the caller from calling again (since the caller doesn't know how long the callee will be busy for). The techniques presented herein provide additional information

Copyright 2016 Cisco Systems, Inc.

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about the callee and/or far-end environment in order to remedy the aforementioned issues that stem from a caller being unaware of why a callee is not answering calls.

Solution Overview

    The techniques provided herein display contextual information before, during, or after a user interface is initiating an outgoing call. This contextual information may serve to manage caller expectations, thereby alleviating impatience and/or frustration, and/or provide information that the caller can use to determine further whether to call again, take some other action (e.g., communicated via a different manner) or take no further action (e.g., do not call again). An example flow and user interface experience is depicted in Figures 1A, 1B, and 1C below. Figure 1B is a continuation of Figure 1A (e.g., step 3 follows step 2), while Figure 1C shows an alternative step 3 that could be implemented in place of steps 3 and 4 from Figure 1B.

In this example, calls may be initiated in a conventional...