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Surface Modification Agent and Resin Coated Sands/Proppants

IP.com Disclosure Number: IPCOM000247029D
Publication Date: 2016-Jul-27
Document File: 4 page(s) / 132K

Publishing Venue

The IP.com Prior Art Database

Abstract

A liquid surface modification agent (SMA) was developed back in the late 1990's for coating proppant as it is being pumped through the blending equipment on the surface and then into the ground for a fracturing treatment.

The coating material dramatically increases the surface friction of the proppant allowing it to stick to surrounding particulates and thus control particle movement. It basically provides for a very sticky surface. It does not, however, cure and provide a high compressive strength which is imparted by system such as resin coated sand. It remains tacky.

It was found that this SMA sometimes caused a reaction with resin coated proppant which caused the resin coated proppant to become very sticky and thus difficult to pass through the fracturing equipment (the blender).

An updated version of the SMA whereby the SMA is contained as the internal component of an emulsion was developed for safety reasons (higher flash point) as well as to try and minimize any interaction with the blending equipment as well as minimize any reaction with the fracturing fluids and especially with any resin coated sands.

Laboratory testing showed that there was much less reaction with resin coated proppants and the invert emulsion SMA compared to the solvent based SMA.

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Surface Modification Agent and Resin Coated Sands/Proppants

Abstract

A liquid surface modification agent (SMA) was developed back in the late 1990's for coating proppant as it is being pumped through the blending equipment on the surface and then into the ground for a fracturing treatment.

The coating material dramatically increases the surface friction of the proppant allowing it to stick to surrounding particulates and thus control particle movement. It basically provides for a very sticky surface. It does not, however, cure and provide a high compressive strength which is imparted by system such as resin coated sand. It remains tacky.

It was found that this SMA sometimes caused a reaction with resin coated proppant which caused the resin coated proppant to become very sticky and thus difficult to pass through the fracturing equipment (the blender).

An updated version of the SMA whereby the SMA is contained as the internal component of an emulsion was developed for safety reasons (higher flash point) as well as to try and minimize any interaction with the blending equipment as well as minimize any reaction with the fracturing fluids and especially with any resin coated sands.

Laboratory testing showed that there was much less reaction with resin coated proppants and the invert emulsion SMA compared to the solvent based SMA.

Introduction

A liquid surface modification agent (SMA) was developed back in the late 1990's for coating proppant as it is being pumped through the blending equipment on the surface and then into the ground for a fracturing treatment.

The Surface Modification Agent is a polymer made from natural resources in a mild, water-soluble solvent. It coats and adheres to the proppant very readily but it is not soluble in typical well fluids such as brines, crude oil, gas, acid, caustic, etc. under most conditions. The benefit provided by the coating is long-lasting.

The coating material dramatically increases the surface friction of the proppant allowing it to stick to surrounding particulates and thus control particle movement. It basically provides for a very sticky surface. It does not, however, cure and provide a high compressive strength which is imparted by system such as resin coated sand. It remains tacky.

High surface friction between the coated proppant grains allows them to withstand relatively high flow rates without flowing back into the wellbore in some cases. Sufficient force can pull the grains coated with the sticky material apart but those particles can then the coated proppant grains can attached to other nearby grains. It is, however, mainly used to enhance the conductivity of the proppant pack and to mitigate fines migration through the proppant pack thus maintaining or enhancing the original pack conductivity.

Benefits

Laboratory testing followed up by a very large number of field applications indicated a number of

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benefits to the system. These benefits would include but is n...