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SIMULTANEOUS MUTUAL SHARING IN A VIRTUAL MEETING ENVIRONMENT

IP.com Disclosure Number: IPCOM000247045D
Publication Date: 2016-Jul-29
Document File: 8 page(s) / 867K

Publishing Venue

The IP.com Prior Art Database

Related People

Yasi Xi: AUTHOR [+4]

Abstract

Presented herein are techniques for mutual sharing in an online or virtual meeting environment. The techniques leverage display layer virtualization to render local operations and remote sharing in two different virtualized screens. The techniques are ideal for a mutual sharing user experience, especially in scenarios such as online training sessions, where a student simulates a teacher's actions and/or a teacher instructs students in a step by step manner. More generally, the techniques presented herein improve online meeting solutions by adding functionality that improves the user experience and, in particular, the collaboration experience.

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SIMULTANEOUS MUTUAL SHARING IN A VIRTUAL MEETING ENVIRONMENT

AUTHORS:

  Yasi Xi Zhaocai Wang Kent Chen

Grant Pan

CISCO SYSTEMS, INC.

ABSTRACT

Presented herein are techniques for mutual sharing in an online or virtual meeting

environment. The techniques leverage display layer virtualization to render local operations and remote sharing in two different virtualized screens. The techniques are ideal for a mutual sharing user experience, especially in scenarios such as online training sessions, where a student simulates a teacher's actions and/or a teacher instructs students in a step by step manner. More generally, the techniques presented herein improve online meeting solutions by adding functionality that improves the user experience and, in particular, the collaboration experience.

DETAILED DESCRIPTION

    Usually, in an online meeting, when a presenter shares his or her desktop to other participants, the presenter is not able to simultaneously view the desktops of the other participants. In other words, the presenter is typically not able to view his or her local desktop while simultaneously viewing the desktops of other conference/meeting participants (and in some cases, the viewers cannot view their desktop while viewing the presentation). However, in some situations, it may be necessary or beneficial for two participants to simultaneously view each others desktops (e.g., while participant A views his local desktop and participant B's remote desktop, participant B views her local desktop and participant A's remote desktop). As one example, if a user needs computer support but does not want to allow a support technician to remotely access/control his computer, it may be beneficial for the participant to see his local desktop and the support technician's local desktop simultaneously. Then, the support technician can show the

Copyright 2016 Cisco Systems, Inc.

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participant how to resolve the issue in a step by step manner (e.g., by performing the operations on her screen while the participant watches). As another example, in a teaching environment, it may be beneficial for a student to perform computing operations as a teacher teaches the operations, instead of simply watching the teacher and trying to replicate the operations at a later time.

    Currently, some video messaging/calling applications provide Picture in Picture (PiP) functionality that allows video call participants to view local video and remote video at the same time. However, PiP typically provides a small inset (e.g., a floating window) for the local video that is hard to see and obscures some content from the remote video. By comparison, as is described in further detail below, the techniques presented herein generate an extra screen by virtualizing the physical display card so that local operations can be performed in one virtual screen and remote sharing can be displayed in another virtual screen. This maximizes the remote sharing windows while allowing...