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A TECHNIQUE FOR RECORDING AND VIEWING INFORMATION RELATING TO A MEDICAL EXAMINATION

IP.com Disclosure Number: IPCOM000247084D
Publication Date: 2016-Aug-03
Document File: 8 page(s) / 206K

Publishing Venue

The IP.com Prior Art Database

Abstract

A technique for recording and viewing information related to a medical examination or exam is disclosed. The technique includes displaying the information both in a chronological view and a thread view. The thread view includes threads based on relevant or related categories. The technique also includes information in form of notes with a level of urgency associated with the notes. The notes may be displayed in the thread view based on the level of urgency.

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A TECHNIQUE FOR RECORDING AND VIEWING INFORMATION RELATING TO A MEDICAL EXAMINATION

BACKGROUND

 

The present disclosure relates generally to medical examination and more particularly to a technique for recording and viewing information relating to a medical examination.

Generally, multiple care givers are taking responsibility of a particular patient in various time slots and for various specialized functions. For quality care, various kinds of information with different degrees of urgency and seriousness are to be taken care of. However, there are multiple instances when less serious and urgent matters get ignored in order to take care of more serious and urgent ones.

For example, in emergency room workflows, clinicians are most concerned with what needs to be treated immediately. Such prioritizing creates risks that non-urgent findings, such as small nodules, are ignored at urgent instances and at later times also due to lapses in stringent follow-up. Such misses lead to negative prognosis and sometimes drastic outcomes like death.   

It would be desirable to have an improved technique for recording and viewing information relating to a medical examination.

BRIEF DESCRIPTION OF DRAWINGS

Figure 1 depicts a wet read of an exam result recorded as a note with no level of urgency. 

Figure 2 depicts response of a radiologist, at a later time to the wet read note of Figure 1.

Figure 3 depicts various categories assignable to the exam note.

Figure 4 depicts selection of level of urgency for the exam note.

Figure 5 depicts addition of content in response of Figure 2.

Figure 6 depicts escalation of level of urgency for the exam note.

Figure 7 depicts de-escalating level of urgency for the exam note.

DETAILED DESCRIPTION

A technique for recording and viewing information related to a medical examination or exam is disclosed. The technique includes displaying the information both in a chronological view and a thread view. The thread view includes threads based on relevant or related categories. The technique also includes information in form of notes with a level of urgency associated with the notes. The notes may be displayed in the thread view based on the level of urgency.

The technique disclosed herein allows different members of a care giving team to communicate with one another about a specific exam in an asynchronous manner. Also, the technique helps maintain a transparent, auditable record of communication that helps provides context to the clinical decisions made for the patient.

Figure 1 depicts a wet read recorded as a note with no level of urgency.  There are instances when an emergency department (ED) doctor needs to provide a wet read on an exam. For example, an X-ray exam performed overnight when radiologists are not available. The ordering doctor looks at the exam report once the exam is complete and provides a preliminary interpretation of result of the X-ray exam.

Figure 1

The ordering doctor documents the interpretation and cont...