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System and Method to Manage Equine Care

IP.com Disclosure Number: IPCOM000247167D
Publication Date: 2016-Aug-11
Document File: 3 page(s) / 42K

Publishing Venue

The IP.com Prior Art Database

Abstract

Disclosed is an Internet of Things (IoT) based method and system that enables the development of customized equine care. The core novelty is the review of daily horse care based on cognitive review of sensor readings, future and past workload, and individual breed characteristics, allowing improved health and reduced healthcare costs.

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System and Method to Manage Equine Care

Horses and other members of the equus genus have different care needs based on individual needs; however, caregivers make most treatment decisions based on general experience or broad standards. Types of decisions can include how hard to push a horse when working it, how long the horse can work, amount of breaks the horse needs, and the amount and type of cool down that the horse needs. A method is needed to identify the needs of an individual animal.

The use of Internet of Things (IoT) sensors in the human population is well known art; however, neither creating an IoT device for the equine population nor the cognitive aspects of determining when to cool down a horse, use food supplements, etc. are known.

The novel solution is an IoT-based method and system that enables the development of customized equine care. The novel approach uses sensor input to manage care and prevent injuries. Owners and trainers customize the appropriate care for an individual animal, while the system learns the care that works best for that animal, accordingly modifies planned schedules, and reacts in real time to conditions that need attention. Thus, the core novelty is the review of daily horse care based on cognitive review of sensor readings, future and past workload, and individual breed characteristics, allowing improved health and reduced healthcare costs.

The horse wears sensors that track heart rate, respiratory rates, body and ambient temperatures, sweating, and sounds. This data represents physical stress levels on a horse (i.e., how hard a horse is working) and how it must be cooled-down (e.g., how long to walk the horses after working, how to brush it, how to wash it down, etc.). The system starts at the macro level with standards for a horse based on age/breed/type of work and then learns over time how to adjust the management of the horse. The system interfaces with a calendar to identify how hard a horse is scheduled to work on a specific day (e.g., how many lessons/rides are scheduled for a stable) or work over a given period to prepare for a specific event (e.g., horse show, race, etc.).

This system enables a stable owner/trainer to manage the individual care of a horse based on how it is reacting on a specific day. For example, the cooling down of a horse is frequently left to junior staff that work based on a generic plan, as opposed to a horse's performance or physical statu...