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TECHNIQUE OF TABLE ANTI-COLLISION FUNCTION BASED ON DISTANCE-MEASURE SENSORS

IP.com Disclosure Number: IPCOM000247298D
Publication Date: 2016-Aug-19
Document File: 4 page(s) / 34K

Publishing Venue

The IP.com Prior Art Database

Abstract

A technique to provide anti-collision function of an X-ray table is disclosed. The technique can be applied with assured safety to the table or a patient positioner used in different imaging domains, for example, X-ray, computed tomography (CT) and magnetic resonance (MR). The technique uses sensors which measure distance to detect presence of an object under a tabletop in a specified safety range. Subsequently, the table motion stops immediately to avoid potential damage. According to an embodiment, the technique includes an X-ray table design that enables anti-collision function. The tabletop is supported by a framework. Distance-measure sensors, such as, ultrasound ranging sensor or Infrared ranging sensor or laser distance measuring sensor are installed on the framework. A position feedback device, such as an encoder or a potentiometer is placed below the sensors on the framework and provides feedback of tabletop location in a longitudinal direction. The position feedback devices and the distance-measure sensors send corresponding signals to a control board. The control board along with a central processing unit (CPU) analyzes the signals, decides for potential collision using a pattern recognition algorithm.

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TECHNIQUE OF TABLE ANTI-COLLISION FUNCTION BASED ON DISTANCE-MEASURE SENSORS

BACKGROUND

The present invention relates generally to a medical imaging table design and more particularly to a technique for providing anti-collision function of the medical imaging table.

Generally, when an X-ray table is moved down, tabletop may collide with chairs or stretcher, even patient legs. This is serious safety issue for both patients and objects placed in proximity to the table.

In a conventional X-ray table design, typically, four micro-switches are installed under the tabletop. Normally the four switches are pressed by pressure of tabletop. Once the tabletop collides with any device or person placed in proximity to the table, the table is held by colliding force, and one or more micro-switches are released without the tabletop pressure. Consequently, a warning signal is generated and sent out to stop downward movement of the table. However, several issues arise due to such anti-collision function of the table. For example, even though the table stops moving downward, in order to activate the micro-switch, a collision was required anyways, may be with other device or person placed in proximity to the table. Such collision results in damage to people or device. In case a heavy patient stays on one side or end of the table, the table-top tilts to release one or more switches, thereby, forbidding the table to move down. In case there is no load on the table, and the table collides with a person or device during downward movement, the maximum force required to trigger the table to stop moving down is decided by weight of the tabletop. However, in case there is a load on the table, the trigger force is required to be greater in dimension as the trigger force needs to elevate the table-top with load on the table.

Therefore, it would be desirable to have a reliable and safe technique to provide anti-collision function of the X-ray table.

BRIEF DESCRIPTION OF DRAWINGS

Figure 1 depicts an X-ray table design which includes sensors and encoders placed inside a tabletop.

Figure 2 depicts a sensor layout design and range of detection by the sensors.

DETAILED DESCRIPTION

A technique to provide anti-collision function of an X-ray table is disclosed. The technique can be applied with assured safety to the table or a patient positioner used in different imaging domains, for example, X-ray, computed tomography (CT) and magnetic resonance (MR). The technique uses sensors which measure distance to detect presence of an object under a tabletop in a specified safety range. Subsequently, the table motion stops immediately to avoid potential damage.

According to an embodiment, the technique includes an X-ray table design that enables anti-collision function. Figure 1 depicts the X-ray table design which includes sensors and encoders placed inside the tabletop.

Figure 1

As illustrated in Figure 1, the tabletop is supported by a framework. Distance-measure sensors, such as, ultr...