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Outdoor power equipment like a dry-type pole mounted transformer, for example, comprising a coated insulator

IP.com Disclosure Number: IPCOM000247307D
Publication Date: 2016-Aug-22
Document File: 3 page(s) / 41K

Publishing Venue

The IP.com Prior Art Database

Related People

ABB Schweiz AG: OWNER

Abstract

The present disclosure belongs to the technical field of electrical power equipment for outdoor use in general and for dry-type pole mounted transformers in particular. Although it is common to select suitable materials that are able to withstand all these stresses, for example EPDM, it became evident that an industrial application leads to disadvantages like large cost, complex production, and/or limited ability to withstand mechanical stresses. The concept disclosed in this document traverses these problems in that a weather and tracking resistant coating is provided on a bulk insulator of the outdoor power equipment. The bulk insulator body may be made of inexpensive indoor material and is coated by a coating containing Silicone, e.g., as liquid silicone rubber, that is easy to apply on the bulk insulator body.

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Outdoor power equipment like a dry-type pole mounted transformer, for example, comprising a coated insulator

Inventors:


Spiros TZAVALAS; Andrej KRIVDA; Jan VAN-LOON; Marco SCHNEIDER; Willi GERIG

ABSTRACT

The present disclosure belongs to the technical field of electrical power equipment for outdoor use in general and for dry-type pole mounted transformers in particular. Although it is common to select suitable materials that are able to withstand all these stresses, for example EPDM, it became evident that an industrial application leads to disadvantages like large cost, complex production, and/or limited ability to withstand mechanical stresses. The concept disclosed in this document traverses these problems in that a weather and tracking resistant coating is provided on a bulk insulator of the outdoor power equipment. The bulk insulator body may be made of inexpensive indoor material and is coated by a coating containing Silicone, e.g., as liquid silicone rubber, that is easy to apply on the bulk insulator body.

Background and technical problem:

Outdoor power equipment must withstand not only electrical, mechanical and thermal stresses but also a range of environmental stresses, such as, UV solar radiation, highly conductive salt spray from the oceans, industrial pollution in the form of carbon black filled rubber particles from car tires, soot from wood, coal and oil combustion, acid rain and acid fog, pesticides delivered by airplanes during crop dusting, decomposing organic matter such as pollen, plankton from the oceans, bird droppings, and mold and fungi accumulation on surfaces, just to mention a few. The standard way of solving the problem is to select materials able to withstand all the stresses. For outdoor applications, these have been mostly ceramic and glass materials in the past. With advances in polymer science, several groups of organic material were also applied and used for insulation purposes in outdoor power equipment, such as EPDM (ethylene propylene diene monomer), polyurethane and advanced epoxy materials such as cycloaliphatic epoxy. However, these materials necessitate other compromises such as large cost, complex production, and/or limited ability to withstand mechanical stresses.

Description of the solution:

It is an object to reduce these drawbacks, in the specific case of dry-type pole mounted transformers. In other fields, there have been attempts to use an inexpensive material, for example indoor epoxy, for the inner body of power equipment, and to apply over this inexpensive material layer of more expensive material, such as cycloaliphatic epoxy, which increases the ability to withstand the environmental stresses. However, these layers were several millimeters thick and needed to be applied in a separate step, and there was no straightforward way to use this technique in the case of pole-mounted transformers, in which the insulator is typically vacuum-casted on the transformer coil.

To solve these...