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Positional Therapy Device for Person Support Apparatus

IP.com Disclosure Number: IPCOM000247312D
Publication Date: 2016-Aug-22
Document File: 9 page(s) / 323K

Publishing Venue

The IP.com Prior Art Database

Abstract

Sleep apnea may be treated by use of a ventilator interface to apply non-invasive positive pressure to the throat of an individual. The positive pressure prevents the airway from collapsing and allows an adequate amount of oxygen to flow into the lungs. The positive pressure may be applied by known ventilation interfaces like continuous positive airway pressure therapy (CPAP), bi-level positive airway pressure therapy (BiPAP), intermittent mechanical positive pressure ventilation (IPPV), or the like. Other known treatments may include use of nasal pillows, nasal dilators, education and/or the like. Steve Hankins shankins@rshc-law.com

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Positional Therapy Device for Person Support Apparatus

This disclosure generally relates to a positional therapy device for a person support apparatus to prevent sleep apnea. More specifically, but not exclusively, the disclosure relates to a positional therapy device with multiple bladders.

Sleep apnea is a chronic disorder in which there are pauses in a breathing cycle or shallow breaths during the sleep. This can be due to obstruction of an airway in a throat of an individual, which results in inadequate supply of oxygen to lungs and therefore causes sleep disruption. Hence, the quality of sleep may suffer and may result in daytime drowsiness, headache, weight gain or loss, limited attention span, memory loss, poor judgment, personality changes, lethargy, inability to maintain concentration and/or depression.

Sleep apnea may be treated by use of a ventilator interface to apply non-invasive positive pressure to the throat of an individual. The positive pressure prevents the airway from collapsing and allows an adequate amount of oxygen to flow into the lungs. The positive pressure may be applied by known ventilation interfaces like continuous positive airway pressure therapy (CPAP), bi-level positive airway pressure therapy (BiPAP), intermittent mechanical positive pressure ventilation (IPPV), or the like. Other known treatments may include use of nasal pillows, nasal dilators, postural education, and/or the like. However, the above-mentioned treatments may be cumbersome and laborious for the individual to comply with on a daily basis. There exists room for development of therapy devices which help an individual (patient) reduce snoring and sleep apnea.

The disclosure generally relates to a positional therapy device for a person support apparatus. The positional therapy device of one embodiment of the disclosure a person support surface. The positional therapy device comprises of a bladder support sheet, multiple bladders, at least one passageway, and a port. The bladder support sheet has a first surface and a second surface. Each of the multiple bladders includes a first inflatable portion and a second inflatable portion. The first inflatable portion is attached to the first surface and the second inflatable portion is attached to the second surface. The at least one passageway is structured to connect each of the multiple bladders to one or more adjacent bladders of the multiple bladders to facilitate fluid communication between the multiple bladders. The port is disposed in at least one of the multiple bladders. The port is configured to inflate and deflate the first inflatable portion and the second inflatable portion of the multiple bladders. On inflation, each of the bladders extends in a perpendicular direction relative to the bladder support sheet, in a progressively increasing manner.

            FIG. 1 shows a perspective view of a person support apparatus 100. The person support apparatus 100 includes a person support...