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CYCLING THROUGH OPTIONS WITH LONG PRESS GESTURES

IP.com Disclosure Number: IPCOM000247407D
Publication Date: 2016-Sep-02
Document File: 5 page(s) / 257K

Publishing Venue

The IP.com Prior Art Database

Related People

Andrew Henderson: AUTHOR [+2]

Abstract

Presented herein are techniques for cycling through options, such as modality options or parameter options typically included in menus, with a long press gesture. The techniques may be embodied as a button, a method, or computer instructions configured to cycle through various options when receiving or detecting a long press. For example, a long press button gesture may allow a user to alter the urgency of a communication or choose a communication modality. These techniques may be used in place of right click menus, drop-down menus, toolbars, or other such user interface features, in order to streamline, simplify, and improve a user interface. For example, infrequently used menu options included on a user interface can be replaced with a long cycle button configured in accordance with the techniques herein to simplify the user interface while still providing the options. This may allow a user interface to incorporate the functional and design advantages of one-click buttons into a user interface while also offering a large range of functionality on the user interface.

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Page 01 of 5

CYCLING THROUGH OPTIONS WITH LONG PRESS GESTURES

AUTHORS:

Andrew Henderson
Keith Griffin

CISCO SYSTEMS, INC.

ABSTRACT

    Presented herein are techniques for cycling through options, such as modality options or parameter options typically included in menus, with a long press gesture. The techniques may be embodied as a button, a method, or computer instructions configured to cycle through various options when receiving or detecting a long press. For example, a long press button gesture may allow a user to alter the urgency of a communication or choose a communication modality. These techniques may be used in place of right click menus, drop-down menus, toolbars, or other such user interface features, in order to streamline, simplify, and improve a user interface. For example, infrequently used menu options included on a user interface can be replaced with a long cycle button configured in accordance with the techniques herein to simplify the user interface while still providing the options. This may allow a user interface to incorporate the functional and design advantages of one-click buttons into a user interface while also offering a large range of functionality on the user interface.

DETAILED DESCRIPTION

    Collaboration systems support a range of communication modalities and rich features. These features are constantly updated and improved; however, the number of features is not always the only factor taken into consideration for marketing and purchasing decisions. There is also an increasing focus on one-click actions in collaboration systems, such as one click to call, since these features may create a user friendly system (e.g., these features make a system easy to use).

Copyright 2016 Cisco Systems, Inc.

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Page 02 of 5

    Unfortunately, only a certain number of one-click features can be included on a user interface before a user interface becomes cluttered. Consequently, the number of features included as one-click features must be balanced against the simplicity and design of a user interface. When features are not included as one-click features or otherwise prominently displayed on a user interface, features may be embedded in menus or submenus. Although the user interface may look cleaner when features are embedded in menus, it can be difficult to fully utilize embedded features on constrained devices, like smartphones, tablets, and other mobile devices. This creates scenarios where users are only presented with limited functionality when accessing a collaboration system from a mobile device, which is increasingly common. For example, if a one-click feature allows a user to initiate a video call, a user on a mobile device may not be able to (or may have difficulty) initiating an audio call through the collaboration system. In some instances, split buttons may be used to provide a one-click button alongside a list of options that the one-click button can be configured to provide; however, these split buttons complicate the elegan...