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3D Scanning with a Retroreflective Glove

IP.com Disclosure Number: IPCOM000247430D
Publication Date: 2016-Sep-07
Document File: 4 page(s) / 119K

Publishing Venue

The IP.com Prior Art Database

Abstract

This paper describes a retroreflective glove for holding and touching an object whilst 3D scanning by using a structured light scanner where the fingers and the hand remain invisible. A reflective glove enables a part of an object to be handled and dynamically moved during scanning, reducing scan time and the need to stitch multiple scan sessions together to form a complete point cloud.

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Page 01 of 4

3D Scanning with a Retroreflective Glove Abstract

This paper describes a retroreflective glove for holding and touching an object whilst 3D scanning by using a structured light scanner where the fingers and the hand remain invisible. A reflective glove enables a part of an object to be handled and dynamically moved during scanning, reducing scan time and the need to stitch multiple scan sessions together to form a complete point cloud.

Introduction

Various contact and non-contact measurement systems of physical objects have long been around. Contact systems include the use of a micrometer or probe-coordinate measuring machine (CMM). Non-contact methods include systems that use white light, laser, Computer Tomography (CT) and light detection and ranging (LIDAR).

3D scanning is a non-contact system where measurements are converted to point clouds or polygon meshes. This is useful for concept designs, reverse engineering, and quality control for example. With the need to accelerate product design and convert ideas into reality quicker, non- contact measuring methods such as white light scanning are becoming increasingly popular and affordable.

White light scanning can take the form of a hand held scanner (an example is provided in Figure
1), which projects a pattern onto the surface of an object where a sensor computes the data from various cameras using triangulation and is able to calculate the distance to the surface. Large orders (i.e., 100,000+) of measurements are taken each second and are converted into a point cloud that may be represented as a 3D object in a computer aided design (CAD) drawing.

Figure 1: Handheld White Light Scanner (www.goscan3d.com)

There are a number of disadvantages of using structured light scanning, such as using the system outdoors and the need for surface preparation of the object if it is shiny or reflective. Another issue that exists is how to scan an object. By placing an object on a surface, the top of the object can be scanned, but to scan the underside requires the use of tracking targets, rotating the object over, carrying out separate scans and then stitching these together. This can be enhanced via the use of a turntable (refer to Figure 2) which makes scanning of the top surface easier without having to move around the part holding the scanner.

Figure 2: Turntable Aid

Reflective markers may also be placed on the surface to act as targets for the scanner as represented in Figure 3.

Figure 3: Reflective Marker Targets


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Scans cannot be taken whilst physically holding a part or placing in a fixture as the geometry of the hand or securing fixture will be captured and joined with the object. Techniques that involve cropping unwanted areas of the scan and then rescanning are generally time consuming and arduous.

This paper describes a glove manufactured from 3MTM ScotchliteTM reflective material, which allows an object to be held and maneuvered during 3D scanning by using a structured...