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Method of helical wrap shroud/screen joining

IP.com Disclosure Number: IPCOM000247435D
Publication Date: 2016-Sep-07
Document File: 1 page(s) / 13K

Publishing Venue

The IP.com Prior Art Database

Abstract

This invention is for a new process to weld helical wrap shroud/screen. These screens are used in the excluder shroud as well as retainer cartridge for and others. This process would use resistance seam welding instead of a more expensive (and another company's proprietary process) tungsten inert gas welding process. Resistance seam welding is optimal for straight line and relatively fast welding speeds. One example of seam welding is for metal gas tank joints. The screen is positioned between a bottom spinning electrode and a top rolling electrode. The screen is wrapped in a helical pattern and resistance welded in between the two electrodes. With mash and finish seam welding, some overlap occurs as the two "plate" (wraps of screen) are positioned for welding. The electrodes apply a force to "mash" them together during welding. As shown in the sketches, as the screen is welded it will be rotated and travel away from the electrode. At that time a cutting head will travel alongside the joint and cut the screen at the appropriate length, all without stopping the welding process. Polymer shroud is a thickness of ~ .060 in. With tungsten inert gas welding the welding speed is ~ 8-10 inches per minute. With seam welding you can achieve at a minimum of 40 inches per minute. This may be increased (possible 400 inches per minute) due to the thin material used with shroud/screen.

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Method of helical wrap shroud/screen joining

This invention is for a new process to weld helical wrap shroud/screen. These screens are used in the excluder shroud as well as retainer cartridge for and others. This process would use resistance seam welding instead of a more expensive (and another company's proprietary process) tungsten inert gas welding process.

Resistance seam welding is optimal for straight line and relatively fast welding speeds. One example of seam welding is for metal gas tank joints. The screen is positioned between a bottom spinning electrode and a top rolling electrode. The screen is wrapped in a helical pattern and resistance welded in between the two electrodes. With mash and finish seam welding, some overlap occurs as the two "plate" (wraps of screen) are positioned for welding. The electrodes apply a force to "mash" them together during welding. As shown in the sketches, as the screen is welded it will be rotated and travel away from the electrode.  At that time a cutting head will travel alongside the joint and cut the screen at the appropriate length, all without stopping the welding process. Polymer shroud is a thickness of ~ .060 in. With tungsten inert gas welding the welding speed is ~ 8-10 inches per minute. With seam welding you can achieve at a minimum of 40 inches per minute. This may be increased (possible 400 inches per minute) due to the thin material used with shroud/screen.