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ADAPTING VIDEOS AND IMAGES TO DETERMINED VISUALLY RELATED IMPAIRMENTS

IP.com Disclosure Number: IPCOM000247443D
Publication Date: 2016-Sep-08

Publishing Venue

The IP.com Prior Art Database

Related People

Reuven Nimrod: AUTHOR [+5]

Abstract

Presented herein are techniques for determining visual or visually related impairments, such as color blindness or photosensitive epilepsy, and transforming images and/or videos based on the determining. Visual impairments including, but not necessarily limited to colorblind impairments and photosensitive epileptic impairments can be determined by detecting or learning sensitives with a test mechanism or interactive configuration. Images and/or videos can then be transformed by applying filters to the images/video and/or by modifying color frequencies in an image or video feed. Regardless, transforming the images/video may improve a video experience for a specific user's impairment. Since color blindness and epilepsy affect a significant portion of the global population, the techniques presented herein may offer an improved viewing experience for a significant portion of the worldwide population. For example, color blindness affects about 5% to 8% of men and about 0.5% of women worldwide, (not to mention other visual deficits that may affect larger percentages of the population, such as color vision deficits acquired as a side effect of a chronic illness) and about 3-5% of the worldwide epileptic population may be photosensitive.

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ADAPTING VIDEOS AND IMAGES TO DETERMINED VISUALLY RELATED IMPAIRMENTS

AUTHORS:

Reuven Nimrod

  Avi Fruchter
Jonathon Pollen
Shabtai Stuart Atlow

Arturo Rodriguez

CISCO SYSTEMS, INC.

ABSTRACT

    Presented herein are techniques for determining visual or visually related impairments, such as color blindness or photosensitive epilepsy, and transforming images and/or videos based on the determining. Visual impairments including, but not necessarily limited to colorblind impairments and photosensitive epileptic impairments can be determined by detecting or learning sensitives with a test mechanism or interactive configuration. Images and/or videos can then be transformed by applying filters to the images/video and/or by modifying color frequencies in an image or video feed. Regardless, transforming the images/video may improve a video experience for a specific user's impairment. Since color blindness and epilepsy affect a significant portion of the global population, the techniques presented herein may offer an improved viewing experience for a significant portion of the worldwide population. For example, color blindness affects about 5% to 8% of men and about 0.5% of women worldwide, (not to mention other visual deficits that may affect larger percentages of the population, such as color vision deficits acquired as a side effect of a chronic illness) and about 3-5% of the worldwide epileptic population may be photosensitive.

DETAILED DESCRIPTION

    There are a number of disabilities, such as color blindness and epilepsy, that negatively affect a viewing experience (e.g., viewing of a video, graphics, images, etc.) and/or the health of a person viewing images or videos (e.g., images or video may cause a

Copyright 2016 Cisco Systems, Inc.

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person with epilepsy to seize, fall, or otherwise become injured). A viewing experience may be most prominently associated with television; however, for when discussed herein, a viewing experience may refer to images and videos viewed on any graphical display and/or user interface. In other words, the techniques provided herein may be implemented in association with a television experience (e.g., implemented at the set top box (STB) or head end distribution (e.g., for video on demand and streaming applications)) and may also be utilized by any devices with a graphical display and/or user interface (e.g. handheld devices, laptops, desktops, telepresence devices, etc.).

    There are various levels of color blindness that affect the viewing experience in different ways. For example, different people may see various colors as the same color (e.g., one person sees green and brown as the same while another sees green and red as the same). In some instances, color blindness may obscure portions of a video program, such as subtitles, portions of an EPG (electronic program guide) or other such on-screen display (OSD), scroll bars, etc. Consequently, color blindness may prevent certain users from fully exper...