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System and Method for a Subsurface Safety Valve with Dual Independent Operating Systems

IP.com Disclosure Number: IPCOM000247737D
Publication Date: 2016-Oct-03
Document File: 1 page(s) / 108K

Publishing Venue

The IP.com Prior Art Database

Abstract

As fail-safe subsurface safety valves (SSVs) are essential to maintaining the safety of personnel, the environment, the general public, and the investment of the well operator. As such, it is imperative that a SSV fail in the closed position when there is a malfunction. Most SSV failures are due to a leak in the SSV's dynamic hydraulic control system seal. Due to this failure mode, it is desirable to have multiple independent operating pistons; however, constructing a SSV with two operating pistons results in doubled hydrostatic pressure being applied to the power spring, which in turn needs to be made much stronger than that used in a SSV with a single operating piston. In this invention, there are two independent operating pistons, each with its own associated power spring, which act downward upon independently movable flow tubes. The upper flow tube is able to actuate the lower flow tube independently of the lower control system, and there is a lighter power spring to lift the weight of the lower flow tube. When the lower control system is utilized, the upper piston and flow tube remains stationary. This arrangement allows the continued operation of the SSV in the event of a dynamic hydraulic seal failure without well intervention.

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System and Method for a Subsurface Safety Valve with Dual Independent Operating Systems

As fail-safe subsurface safety valves (SSVs) are essential to maintaining the safety of personnel, the environment, the general public, and the investment of the well operator. As such, it is imperative that a SSV fail in the closed position when there is a malfunction. Most SSV failures are due to a leak in the SSV's dynamic hydraulic control system seal. Due to this failure mode, it is desirable to have multiple independent operating pistons; however, constructing a SSV with two operating pistons results in doubled hydrostatic pressure being applied to the power spring, which in turn needs to be made much stronger than that used in a SSV with a single operating piston. In this invention, there are two independent operating pistons, each with its own associated power spring, which act downward upon independently movable flow tubes. The upper flow tube is able to actuate the lower flow tube independently of the lower control system, and there is a lighter power spring to lift the weight of the lower flow tube. When the lower control system is utilized, the upper piston and flow tube remains stationary. This arrangement allows the continued operation of the SSV in the event of a dynamic hydraulic seal failure without well intervention.